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Title: Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing

Abstract

Feature extraction and evaluation are two procedures common to the development of any pattern recognition application. These features are the primary pieces of information which are used to train the pattern recognition tool, whether that tool is a neural network, a fuzzy logic rulebase, or a genetic algorithm. Careful selection of the features to be used by the pattern recognition tool can significantly streamline the overall development and training of the solution for the pattern recognition application. This report summarizes the development of an integrated, computer-based software package called the Feature Extraction Toolbox (FET), which can be used for the development and deployment of solutions to generic pattern recognition problems. This toolbox integrates a number of software techniques for signal processing, feature extraction and evaluation, and pattern recognition, all under a single, user-friendly development environment. The toolbox has been developed to run on a laptop computer, so that it may be taken to a site and used to develop pattern recognition applications in the field. A prototype version of this toolbox has been completed and is currently being used for applications development on several projects in support of the Department of Energy.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
776968
Report Number(s):
KCP-613-6424
TRN: AH200121%%37
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-01AL66850
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 3 Apr 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; F CODES; ALGORITHMS; FUZZY LOGIC; NEURAL NETWORKS; PATTERN RECOGNITION; PROGRAMMING; TRAINING

Citation Formats

Baumgart, C.W. Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing. United States: N. p., 2001. Web. doi:10.2172/776968.
Baumgart, C.W. Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing. United States. doi:10.2172/776968.
Baumgart, C.W. Tue . "Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing". United States. doi:10.2172/776968. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/776968.
@article{osti_776968,
title = {Intelligent Software Tools for Advanced Computing},
author = {Baumgart, C.W.},
abstractNote = {Feature extraction and evaluation are two procedures common to the development of any pattern recognition application. These features are the primary pieces of information which are used to train the pattern recognition tool, whether that tool is a neural network, a fuzzy logic rulebase, or a genetic algorithm. Careful selection of the features to be used by the pattern recognition tool can significantly streamline the overall development and training of the solution for the pattern recognition application. This report summarizes the development of an integrated, computer-based software package called the Feature Extraction Toolbox (FET), which can be used for the development and deployment of solutions to generic pattern recognition problems. This toolbox integrates a number of software techniques for signal processing, feature extraction and evaluation, and pattern recognition, all under a single, user-friendly development environment. The toolbox has been developed to run on a laptop computer, so that it may be taken to a site and used to develop pattern recognition applications in the field. A prototype version of this toolbox has been completed and is currently being used for applications development on several projects in support of the Department of Energy.},
doi = {10.2172/776968},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2001},
month = {Tue Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2001}
}

Technical Report:

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