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Title: THE CERRO GRANDE FIRE, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO

Abstract

No abstract prepared.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
776394
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-01-1630
TRN: AH200134%%281
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, Conference dates not supplied; Other Information: PBD: 1 Mar 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; LOS ALAMOS; NEW MEXICO; FIRES

Citation Formats

M. D. WEBB, and K. CARPENTER. THE CERRO GRANDE FIRE, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
M. D. WEBB, & K. CARPENTER. THE CERRO GRANDE FIRE, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO. United States.
M. D. WEBB, and K. CARPENTER. Thu . "THE CERRO GRANDE FIRE, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/776394.
@article{osti_776394,
title = {THE CERRO GRANDE FIRE, LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO},
author = {M. D. WEBB and K. CARPENTER},
abstractNote = {No abstract prepared.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to analyze the environmental consequences resulting from the future disposition of certain flood retention structures built in the wake of the Cerro Grande Fire within the boundaries of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In May 2000, a prescription burn, started on Federally-administered land to the northwest of LANL, blew out of control and was designated as a wildfire. This wildfire, which became known as the Cerro Grande Fire, burned approximately 7,650 acres (3,061 hectares) within the boundaries of LANL before it was extinguished. During the fire a number of emergency actions were undertakenmore » by the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to suppress and extinguish the fire within LANL; immediately thereafter, NNSA undertook additional emergency actions to address the post-fire conditions. Due to hydrophobic soils (non-permeable soil areas created as a result of very high temperatures often associated with wild fires) and the loss of vegetation from steep canyon sides caused by the fire, surface runoff and soil erosion on hillsides above LANL were greatly increased over prefire levels. The danger to LANL facilities and structures and homes located down-canyon from the burned area was magnified.« less
  • During the week of May 10-14, 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire scorched over 40,000 acres of prime forestland and destroyed over 400 homes in the Los Alamos community and several structures at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Of the land affected by the fire, nearly one quarter of it was Laboratory property. All of LANL's 64 material balance areas (MBAs) were affected to some degree, but one Category I technical area and several Category I11 and IV areas sustained heavy damage. When the MC&A personnel were allowed to return to work on May 23, they addressed the following problems:more » How do we assure both ourselves and the Department of Energy (DOE) that no nuclear materials had been compromised? How do we assist the nuclear material (NM) custodians and their operating groups so that they can resume normal MC&A operations? Immediately after the return to work, the Laboratory issued emergency MC&A assurance actions for Category I through Category IV facilities. We conducted special inventories, area walkthroughs, and other forms of evaluation so that within a month after the fire, we were able to release the last MBA to resume work and assure that all nuclear material had been accounted for. This paper discusses the measures LANL adopted to ensure that none of its nuclear material had been compromised.« less
  • In May of 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 8,000 acres of Department of Energy (DOE) managed land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Although the fire was generally of low intensity, it impacted a significant number of LANL's cultural resources. Historic wooden properties were affected more heavily than prehistoric archaeological sites. This paper will provide an overview of the Homestead and Manhattan Project Periods at LANL and will discuss the effects of the Cerro Grande Fire on historic wooden properties. Post-fire cultural resource management issues will also be discussed.
  • In May 2000 the Cerro Grande wildfire swept through Los Alamos, New Mexico, burning approximately 17,400 ha (43,000 acres) and causing evacuation of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the communities of Los Alamos and White Rock. An integral part of emergency response during the fire was the use of geographic information system (GIS) technology, which continues to be used in support of post-fire restoration and environmental monitoring. During the fire Laboratory GIS staff and volunteers from other organizations worked to produce maps and provide support for emergency managers, including at an emergency GIS facility in Santa Fe. Subsequent tomore » the fire, Laboratory GIS teams supported the multiagency Burned Area Emergency Rehabilitation (BAER) team to provide GIS data and maps for planning mitigation efforts. The GIS teams continue to help researchers, operations personnel, and managers deal with the tremendous changes caused by the fire. Much of the work is under the auspices of the Cerro Grande Rehabilitation Project (CGRP) to promote recovery from fire damage, improve information exchange, enhance emergency management, and conduct mitigation activities. GIS efforts during the fire provided important lessons about institutional matters, working relationships, and emergency preparedness. These lessons include the importance of (1) an integrated framework for assessing natural and human hazards in a landscape context; (2) a strong GIS capability for emergency response; (3) coordinated emergency plans for GIS operations; (4) a method for employees to report their whereabouts and receive authoritative information during an evacuation; (5) GIS data that are complete, backed-up, and available during an emergency; (6) adaptation of GIS to the circumstances of the emergency; (7) better coordination in the GIS community; (8) better integration of GIS into LANL operations; and (9) a central data warehouse for data and metadata. These lessons are important for planning future directions of GIS at LANL. Growing maturity of GIS is expected to lead to standardization and a better-integrated, more-coordinated approach to data sharing and emergency management at LANL, and within DOE, in accord with the federal government's increasing focus on electronic communication for its organizational and public interactions.« less
  • Soil surface (0- to 2-in. depth) samples were collected from areas within and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) just after the Cerro Grande fire, analyzed for radionuclides, radioactivity, and trace elements (heavy metals), and compared to soil samples collected in 1999 from the same sites. In addition, many types of organic substances (volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, high explosives, and dioxin and dioxin-like compounds) were assessed in soils from LANL, perimeter, and regional sites after the fire. Results show that impacts to regional, perimeter, and on-site (mesa top) areas from smoke and fallout ash asmore » a result of the Cerro Grande fire were minimal.« less