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Title: Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses

Abstract

Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential featuremore » for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity, and n on-specific protein adsorption, properties which are thought to correlate with comfort in the eye. The outcome of these studies was the discovery of a new material that is superior to present commercial materials. Contact lenses composed of a sulfoxide acrylate and 2-(hydroxyethyl)methacrylate are presently undergoing clinical evaluation at Sunsoft and, if successful, these novel lenses should be commercially available within the next two years.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science. Office of Basic Energy Studies. Division of Materials Sciences (US)
OSTI Identifier:
775141
Report Number(s):
LBNL-46168
R&D Project: 880301; TRN: AH200120%%475
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; CARBOHYDRATES; HYDRATION; LENSES; POLYMERS; LUBRICANTS; PROTEINS; TESTING; BIOMOLECULAR HYDROGELS BIOCOMPATIBLE CONTACT LENS MATERIALS

Citation Formats

Bertozzi, Carolyn R. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/775141.
Bertozzi, Carolyn R. Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses. United States. doi:10.2172/775141.
Bertozzi, Carolyn R. Thu . "Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses". United States. doi:10.2172/775141. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/775141.
@article{osti_775141,
title = {Development and testing of new biologically-based polymers as advanced biocompatible contact lenses},
author = {Bertozzi, Carolyn R.},
abstractNote = {Nature has evolved complex and elegant materials well suited to fulfill a myriad of functions. Lubricants, structural scaffolds and protective sheaths can all be found in nature, and these provide a rich source of inspiration for the rational design of materials for biomedical applications. Many biological materials are based in some fashion on hydrogels, the crosslinked polymers that absorb and hold water. Biological hydrogels contribute to processes as diverse as mineral nucleation during bone growth and protection and hydration of the cell surface. The carbohydrate layer that coats all living cells, often referred to as the glycocalyx, has hydrogel-like properties that keep cell surfaces well hydrated, segregated from neighboring cells, and resistant to non-specific protein deposition. With the molecular details of cell surface carbohydrates now in hand, adaptation of these structural motifs to synthetic materials is an appealing strategy for improving biocompatibility. The goal of this collaborative project between Prof. Bertozzi's research group, the Center for Advanced Materials at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sunsoft Corporation was the design, synthesis and characterization of novel hydrogel polymers for improved soft contact lens materials. Our efforts were motivated by the urgent need for improved materials that allow extended wear, and essential feature for those whose occupation requires the use of contact lenses rather than traditional spectacles. Our strategy was to transplant the chemical features of cell surface molecules into contact lens materials so that they more closely resemble the tissue in which they reside. Specifically, we integrated carbohydrate molecules similar to those found on cell surfaces, and sulfoxide materials inspired by the properties of the carbohydrates, into hydrogels composed of biocompatible and manufacturable substrates. The new materials were characterized with respect to surface and bulk hydrophilicity, and n on-specific protein adsorption, properties which are thought to correlate with comfort in the eye. The outcome of these studies was the discovery of a new material that is superior to present commercial materials. Contact lenses composed of a sulfoxide acrylate and 2-(hydroxyethyl)methacrylate are presently undergoing clinical evaluation at Sunsoft and, if successful, these novel lenses should be commercially available within the next two years.},
doi = {10.2172/775141},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}