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Title: Heavy Vehicle Essential Power Systems Workshop

Abstract

Essential power is a crosscutting technology area that addresses the efficient and practical management of electrical and thermal requirements on trucks. Essential Power Systems: any function on the truck, that is not currently involved in moving the truck, and requires electrical or mechanical energy; Truck Lights; Hotel Loads (HVAC, computers, appliances, lighting, entertainment systems); Pumps, starter, compressor, fans, trailer refrigeration; Engine and fuel heating; and Operation of power lifts and pumps for bulk fluid transfer. Transition from ''belt and gear driven'' to auxiliary power generation of electricity - ''Truck Electrification'' 42 volts, DC and/ or AC; All electrically driven auxiliaries; Power on demand - manage electrical loads; Benefits include: increased fuel efficiency, reduced emission both when truck is idling and moving down the road.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, Washington, DC (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) (EE-33) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
771181
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: DOE/OHVT Essential Power Systems Workshop, Washington, DC (US), 12/12/2001--12/13/2001; Other Information: PBD: 12 Dec 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; APPLIANCES; BLOWERS; COMPUTERS; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRICITY; ENGINES; HEATING; MANAGEMENT; POWER GENERATION; POWER SYSTEMS; REFRIGERATION

Citation Formats

Susan Rogers. Heavy Vehicle Essential Power Systems Workshop. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Susan Rogers. Heavy Vehicle Essential Power Systems Workshop. United States.
Susan Rogers. Wed . "Heavy Vehicle Essential Power Systems Workshop". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/771181.
@article{osti_771181,
title = {Heavy Vehicle Essential Power Systems Workshop},
author = {Susan Rogers},
abstractNote = {Essential power is a crosscutting technology area that addresses the efficient and practical management of electrical and thermal requirements on trucks. Essential Power Systems: any function on the truck, that is not currently involved in moving the truck, and requires electrical or mechanical energy; Truck Lights; Hotel Loads (HVAC, computers, appliances, lighting, entertainment systems); Pumps, starter, compressor, fans, trailer refrigeration; Engine and fuel heating; and Operation of power lifts and pumps for bulk fluid transfer. Transition from ''belt and gear driven'' to auxiliary power generation of electricity - ''Truck Electrification'' 42 volts, DC and/ or AC; All electrically driven auxiliaries; Power on demand - manage electrical loads; Benefits include: increased fuel efficiency, reduced emission both when truck is idling and moving down the road.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 12 00:00:00 EST 2001},
month = {Wed Dec 12 00:00:00 EST 2001}
}

Conference:
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