skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles

Abstract

Summaries of paper: Emission requirements dictate vehicle update cycles; Packaging, performance and cost impacted; Styling updates can be integrated; Opportunity to integrate features and performance; Non-uniform regulations challenge resources; and Customers won't expect to pay more or receive less.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
John Deere Power Systems (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) (EE-33) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
771179
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location not supplied, 04/18/2001; Other Information: PBD: 18 Apr 2001
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; PACKAGING; PERFORMANCE; REGULATIONS; VEHICLES

Citation Formats

Kirby Baumgard, and Steve Ephraim. Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles. United States: N. p., 2001. Web.
Kirby Baumgard, & Steve Ephraim. Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles. United States.
Kirby Baumgard, and Steve Ephraim. 2001. "Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/771179.
@article{osti_771179,
title = {Future Emissions Impact On Off-Road Vehicles},
author = {Kirby Baumgard and Steve Ephraim},
abstractNote = {Summaries of paper: Emission requirements dictate vehicle update cycles; Packaging, performance and cost impacted; Styling updates can be integrated; Opportunity to integrate features and performance; Non-uniform regulations challenge resources; and Customers won't expect to pay more or receive less.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2001,
month = 4
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • Abstract not provided.
  • The MC2-CALGRID photochemical modeling system is used to simulate the impact of a future year emissions control scenario on an ozone episode. The control scenario involves replacing the entire light duty gasoline car and truck fleet in the Lower Fraser Valley with liquid propane gas technology in a future year. A set of exposure related measures is used to evaluate the net impact of the fuel substitution compared to the future year base case simulation and a similar compressed natural gas control scenario. The simulation suggests that the benefits of switching to liquid propane gas are relatively small for themore » Lower Fraser Valley, especially when compared against the compressed natural gas scenario. The sensitivity of the model results to changes in the NO{sub x} to VOC ratio of the light duty vehicle fleet emissions demonstrates that the modeled future year base case is VOC limited, thus explaining the small impact of the liquid propane gas substitution.« less
  • One part of the CARB/EPA coordinated In-Use Automobile Emissions field study of 1991 carried out in the Los Angeles area was the phase to examine the operation and emissions characteristics of high emitting carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) vehicles. In the part of the study, high CO and HC emitting in-use, consumer vehicles were detected by the cross-road remote sensors and pulled over for I/M testing. Vehicles were selected from those tested on the roadside inspection for further testing on a portable dynamometer set up in a nearby park. The selected vehicles were chosen by the author and hadmore » to meet the qualifications of having good tires, no coolant leaks and no exhaust leaks. The dynamometer test took between 20 and 30 minutes and was voluntary.« less
  • Improved methods for studying atmospheric light scattering caused by road vehicles are discussed. It was determined that roadway visibility was not substantially affected by vehicular aerosols and that most of the light scattering should be from Diesel vehicle aerosols.
  • This note describes some measurements of manganese concentrations and manganese emission rates, categorized as to vehicle type, from cars and trucks at two tunnels on the Pennsylvania Turnpike. These measurements were made during the period that methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) came into use as an alternative to organo-lead compounds for improving combustion in gasoline engines.