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Title: Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor

Abstract

The Radiative Divertor Program of DIII-D is in its final phase with the installation of the cryopump and baffle structure (Phase 1B Divertor) in the upper inner radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel at the end of this calendar year. This divertor, in conjunction with the Advanced Divertor and the Phase 1A Divertor, located in the lower and upper outer radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel respectively, provides pumping for density control of the plasma while minimizing the effects on the core confinement. Each divertor consists of a cryobelium cooling ring and a shielded protective structure. The cryo/helium-cooled pumps of all three diverters exhaust helium from the plasma. The protective shielded structure or baffle structure, in the case of the diverters located at the top of the vacuum vessel, provides baffling of neutral charged particles and minimize the flow of impurities back into the core of the plasma. The baffles, which consist of water-cooled panels that allow for the attachment of tiles of various sizes and shapes, house gas puff systems. The intent of the puffing systems is to inject gas in and around the divertor to minimize the heat flux on specific areas on the divertor and its components.more » The reduction of the heat flux on the divertor minimizes the impurities that are generated from excess heat on divertor components, specifically tiles. Experiments involving the gas puff systems and the divertor structures have shown the heat flux can be spread over a large area of the divertor, reducing the peak heat flux in specific areas. The three diverters also incorporate a variety of diagnostic tools such as halo current monitors, magnetic probes and thermocouples to monitor certain plasma characteristics as well as determine the effectiveness of the cryopumps and baffle configurations. The diverters were designed to optimize pumping performance and to withstand the electromagnetic loads from both halo currents and toroidal induced currents. Incorporated also into the designs of the structures is the capability to withstand the thermal gradient across the structures and the DIII-D vacuum vessel during operations and bakeout in which temperatures reach as high as 350 C. The performance of the diagnostics and divertor systems with experimental results of the two existing systems are reported in this paper along with the baseline of the designs of the three divertor systems.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
General Atomics, San Diego, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
766809
Report Number(s):
GA-A23284
TRN: US0109394
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-99ER54463; W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering, Albuquerque, NM (US), 10/25/1999--10/29/1999; Other Information: PBD: 1 Nov 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; DIVERTORS; DOUBLET-3 DEVICE; HEAT FLUX; MAGNETIC PROBES; TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS; PERFORMANCE; CRYOPUMPS; BAFFLES; PLASMA DENSITY; PROCESS CONTROL

Citation Formats

R.C. O'Neill, A.S. Bozek, M.E. Friend, C.B. Baxi, E.E. Reis, M.A. Mahdavi, D.G. Nilson, S.L. Allen, and W.P. West. Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
R.C. O'Neill, A.S. Bozek, M.E. Friend, C.B. Baxi, E.E. Reis, M.A. Mahdavi, D.G. Nilson, S.L. Allen, & W.P. West. Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor. United States.
R.C. O'Neill, A.S. Bozek, M.E. Friend, C.B. Baxi, E.E. Reis, M.A. Mahdavi, D.G. Nilson, S.L. Allen, and W.P. West. Mon . "Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/766809.
@article{osti_766809,
title = {Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor},
author = {R.C. O'Neill and A.S. Bozek and M.E. Friend and C.B. Baxi and E.E. Reis and M.A. Mahdavi and D.G. Nilson and S.L. Allen and W.P. West},
abstractNote = {The Radiative Divertor Program of DIII-D is in its final phase with the installation of the cryopump and baffle structure (Phase 1B Divertor) in the upper inner radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel at the end of this calendar year. This divertor, in conjunction with the Advanced Divertor and the Phase 1A Divertor, located in the lower and upper outer radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel respectively, provides pumping for density control of the plasma while minimizing the effects on the core confinement. Each divertor consists of a cryobelium cooling ring and a shielded protective structure. The cryo/helium-cooled pumps of all three diverters exhaust helium from the plasma. The protective shielded structure or baffle structure, in the case of the diverters located at the top of the vacuum vessel, provides baffling of neutral charged particles and minimize the flow of impurities back into the core of the plasma. The baffles, which consist of water-cooled panels that allow for the attachment of tiles of various sizes and shapes, house gas puff systems. The intent of the puffing systems is to inject gas in and around the divertor to minimize the heat flux on specific areas on the divertor and its components. The reduction of the heat flux on the divertor minimizes the impurities that are generated from excess heat on divertor components, specifically tiles. Experiments involving the gas puff systems and the divertor structures have shown the heat flux can be spread over a large area of the divertor, reducing the peak heat flux in specific areas. The three diverters also incorporate a variety of diagnostic tools such as halo current monitors, magnetic probes and thermocouples to monitor certain plasma characteristics as well as determine the effectiveness of the cryopumps and baffle configurations. The diverters were designed to optimize pumping performance and to withstand the electromagnetic loads from both halo currents and toroidal induced currents. Incorporated also into the designs of the structures is the capability to withstand the thermal gradient across the structures and the DIII-D vacuum vessel during operations and bakeout in which temperatures reach as high as 350 C. The performance of the diagnostics and divertor systems with experimental results of the two existing systems are reported in this paper along with the baseline of the designs of the three divertor systems.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {11}
}

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