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Title: Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site

Abstract

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Aiken, South Carolina that is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At SRS Draeger tubes are used to identify the amount and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Draeger tubes rely on a chemical reaction to identify the nature and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Disposal practices for these tubes were identified by performing a hazardous waste evaluation per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Additional investigations were conducted to provide guidance for their safe handling, storage and disposal. A list of Draeger tubes commonly used at SRS was first evaluated to determine if they contained any material that could render them as a RCRA hazardous waste. Disposal techniques for Draeger tubes that contained any of the toxic contaminants listed in South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79. 261.24 (b) and/or contained an acid in the liquid form were addressed.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
765412
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-2000-00642
TRN: US0005390
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: SEMA Conference-Environmental Management, Martinez, GA (US), 11/09/2000; Other Information: PBD: 13 Oct 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; WASTE MANAGEMENT; CHEMICAL WASTES; AIR SAMPLERS; GAS ANALYSIS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; WASTE DISPOSAL

Citation Formats

Malik, N.P.. Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Malik, N.P.. Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site. United States.
Malik, N.P.. Fri . "Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/765412.
@article{osti_765412,
title = {Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site},
author = {Malik, N.P.},
abstractNote = {The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Aiken, South Carolina that is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At SRS Draeger tubes are used to identify the amount and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Draeger tubes rely on a chemical reaction to identify the nature and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Disposal practices for these tubes were identified by performing a hazardous waste evaluation per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Additional investigations were conducted to provide guidance for their safe handling, storage and disposal. A list of Draeger tubes commonly used at SRS was first evaluated to determine if they contained any material that could render them as a RCRA hazardous waste. Disposal techniques for Draeger tubes that contained any of the toxic contaminants listed in South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79. 261.24 (b) and/or contained an acid in the liquid form were addressed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Oct 13 00:00:00 EDT 2000},
month = {Fri Oct 13 00:00:00 EDT 2000}
}

Conference:
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  • Carbon-14 is one of the radioactive isotopes of concern in low-level radioactive waste (LLW) because it has a long half-life, is highly mobile in the environment, and is readily taken into plants and animals. Reactor operations at the Savannah River Site produce {sup 14}C by way of the {sup 17}O(n,{alpha}){sup 14}C reaction in the heavy water moderator. The moderator is purified periodically, and the spent resin is disposed of on-site at the radioactive waste management facility inside stainless steel vessels. Since the plant began operations, {approximately}6,800 Ci of {sup 14}C have been disposed of in this manner. A performance assessmentmore » using the PATHRAE computer code and literature values for key parameters such as partition coefficient, leach rate, and infiltration rate gave calculated doses of {approximately}1 rem/yr occurring within a few hundred years of disposal. The purpose of this work is to develop and incorporate site-specific values and then determine the effect on calculated dose.« less
  • A 56-acre site at the Savannah River Plant was used as a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility from 1972 through 1985; however, quantities of the hazardous materials lead, cadmium, scintillation fluid, and oil were disposed of at the site as well. In 1985, operations at the site were halted and a Closure Plan was submitted to the State of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. The actions leading to closure of the facility will include stabilization, capping, and monitoring. A test program has been conducted to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of several stabilization techniques and capping materials.
  • This paper discusses the high-level radioactive waste that has accumulated at the Savannah River Site and is stored in large underground steel tanks. Programs to remove the soluble waste from the storage tanks, decontaminate it by removing cesium and strontium, and dispose of the resulting low-level alkaline salt solution are described. Recent modifications and the current status of the in-tank precipitation and the saltstone processes are described.
  • An important objective of the Savannah River Site`s low-level radioactive waste management program is to isolate the waste from the environment both now and well into the future. A key element in achieving this is the disposal of low-level radioactive waste in sealed concrete vaults. Historically the Site has disposed of low-level radioactive waste via shallow land burial. In 1987, it was decided that better isolation from the environment was required. At that time several options for achieving this isolation were studied and below grade concrete vaults were chosen as the best method. This paper discusses the performance objectives formore » the vaults, the current design of the vaults and plans for the design of future vaults, the cost to construct the vaults, and the performance assessment on the vaults. Construction of the first set of vaults is essentially complete and readiness reviews before the start of waste receipt are being performed. Startup is to begin late in calendar year 1992 and continue through early CY 1993. The performance assessment is under way and the first draft is to be completed in early 1993.« less
  • A vitrification process was developed and successfully implemented by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) and at the West Valley Nuclear Services (WVNS) to convert high-level liquid nuclear wastes (HLLW) to a solid borosilicate glass for safe long term geologic disposal. Over the last decade, SRS has successfully completed two additional vitrification projects to safely dispose of mixed low level wastes (MLLW) (radioactive and hazardous) at the SRS and at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The SRS, in conjunction with other laboratories, has also demonstrated that vitrification can be used to dispose of a wide varietymore » of MLLW and low-level wastes (LLW) at the SRS, at ORR, at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), at Rocky Flats (RF), at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), and at the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project (HWVP). The SRS, in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute and the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA), have demonstrated that vitrification can also be used to safely dispose of ion-exchange (IEX) resins and sludges from commercial nuclear reactors. In addition, the SRS has successfully demonstrated that numerous wastes declared hazardous by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) can be vitrified, e.g. mining industry wastes, contaminated harbor sludges, asbestos containing material (ACM), Pb-paint on army tanks and bridges. Once these EPA hazardous wastes are vitrified, the waste glass is rendered non-hazardous allowing these materials to be recycled as glassphalt (glass impregnated asphalt for roads and runways), roofing shingles, glasscrete (glass used as aggregate in concrete), or other uses. Glass is also being used as a medium to transport SRS americium (Am) and curium (Cm) to the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for recycle in the ORR medical source program and use in smoke detectors at an estimated value of $1.5 billion to the general public.« less