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Title: The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Spectromicroscopy and fast timing

Abstract

Two recently commissioned infrared beamlines on the 1.4 bending magnet port at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL, are described. Using a synchrotron as an IR source provides three primary advantages: increased brightness, very fast light pulses, and enhanced far-IR flux. The considerable brightness advantage manifests itself most beneficially when performing spectroscopy on a microscopic length scale. Beamline (BL) 1.4.3 is a dedicated FTIR spectromicroscopy beamline, where a diffraction-limited spot size using the synchrotron source is utilized. BL 1.4.2 consists of a vacuum FTIR bench with a wide spectral range and step-scan capability. This BL makes use of the pulsed nature of the synchrotron light as well as the far-IR flux. Fast timing is demonstrated by observing the pulses from the electron bunch storage pattern at the ALS. Results from several experiments from both IR beamlines will be presented as an overview of the IR research currently being done at the ALS.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Director, Office of Science. Office of Basic Energy Studies. Division of Materials Sciences (US)
OSTI Identifier:
764347
Report Number(s):
LBNL-44208
R&D Project: 458121; TRN: US0005197
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 4th International Conference on Low Energy Electrodynamics in Solids, LEES '99, Pecs (HU), 06/21/1999--06/25/1999; Other Information: PBD: 1 Sep 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE; BEAM BENDING MAGNETS; ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; VISIBLE RADIATION; INFRARED RADIATION; FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETERS; SYNCHROTRON INFRARED FTIR BEAMLINE

Citation Formats

Martin, Michael C., and McKinney, Wayne R. The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Spectromicroscopy and fast timing. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Martin, Michael C., & McKinney, Wayne R. The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Spectromicroscopy and fast timing. United States.
Martin, Michael C., and McKinney, Wayne R. Wed . "The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Spectromicroscopy and fast timing". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/764347.
@article{osti_764347,
title = {The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Spectromicroscopy and fast timing},
author = {Martin, Michael C. and McKinney, Wayne R.},
abstractNote = {Two recently commissioned infrared beamlines on the 1.4 bending magnet port at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL, are described. Using a synchrotron as an IR source provides three primary advantages: increased brightness, very fast light pulses, and enhanced far-IR flux. The considerable brightness advantage manifests itself most beneficially when performing spectroscopy on a microscopic length scale. Beamline (BL) 1.4.3 is a dedicated FTIR spectromicroscopy beamline, where a diffraction-limited spot size using the synchrotron source is utilized. BL 1.4.2 consists of a vacuum FTIR bench with a wide spectral range and step-scan capability. This BL makes use of the pulsed nature of the synchrotron light as well as the far-IR flux. Fast timing is demonstrated by observing the pulses from the electron bunch storage pattern at the ALS. Results from several experiments from both IR beamlines will be presented as an overview of the IR research currently being done at the ALS.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}

Conference:
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