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Title: Advanced Collimator Prototype Results for the NLC

Abstract

The Next Linear Collider accelerator will include a large (kilometer scale) and complex collimation system. The size and complexity of this system could be reduced if the collimator jaws could be made immune to damage from the electron beam. The authors describe two collimation systems currently under development. Construction of a prototype system which uses wheels that can be moved to a new position after damage is underway. The second system, currently in the R+D phase, uses rotors which are continuously reformed from a bath of liquid metal as the collimation surface. This second system allows operation at beam intensities which damage the jaws on every pulse. They describe results of tests on both systems.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
763791
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-8463
TRN: US0004827
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 5 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; LINEAR COLLIDERS; COLLIMATORS; DESIGN; ELECTRON BEAMS; RADIATION EFFECTS; MITIGATION; PERFORMANCE TESTING

Citation Formats

Frisch, Josef C. Advanced Collimator Prototype Results for the NLC. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/763791.
Frisch, Josef C. Advanced Collimator Prototype Results for the NLC. United States. doi:10.2172/763791.
Frisch, Josef C. Mon . "Advanced Collimator Prototype Results for the NLC". United States. doi:10.2172/763791. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/763791.
@article{osti_763791,
title = {Advanced Collimator Prototype Results for the NLC},
author = {Frisch, Josef C},
abstractNote = {The Next Linear Collider accelerator will include a large (kilometer scale) and complex collimation system. The size and complexity of this system could be reduced if the collimator jaws could be made immune to damage from the electron beam. The authors describe two collimation systems currently under development. Construction of a prototype system which uses wheels that can be moved to a new position after damage is underway. The second system, currently in the R+D phase, uses rotors which are continuously reformed from a bath of liquid metal as the collimation surface. This second system allows operation at beam intensities which damage the jaws on every pulse. They describe results of tests on both systems.},
doi = {10.2172/763791},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

Technical Report:

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