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Title: K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with relatively little morbidity. We extended the principles learned with coronary angiography to noninvasive imaging of the human bronchial tree. For these images, we utilized xenon as the contrast agent, as it has a K-edge very similar to that of iodine. In this case, there is no true competing diagnostic test, and pulmonary neoplasm is an enormous publicmore » health concern. In early experiments, we demonstrated remarkably clear images of the human bronchial tree. These images have been shown internationally; however, funding difficulties primarily with the Department of Energy have not allowed for progression of this promising avenue of research. One potential criticism of the project is that in order to obtain these images, we utilized national laboratories. Some have questioned whether this would lead to a practical imaging modality. However, we have shown that the technology exists to allow for construction of a miniature storage ring, with a superconducting wiggler magnet, which would occupy minimal space, and would be of a cost comparable with that of a clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory. Much of the focus of this research is now shifting to Europe, where individual whom we have trained or with whom we have worked are now heading up extensive efforts in medical imaging and K-edge dichromography. This work is occurring mostly at DESY in Hamburg, and at the European Synchrotrons Research Laboratory (ESRF) in Grenoble. (B204)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford University, Stanford, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
762052
DOE Contract Number:  
FG03-87ER60527
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Supercedes report DE00762052; PBD: 31 Dec 1996; PBD: 31 Dec 1996; PBD: 31 Dec 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ARTERIES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; BLOOD VESSELS; DISEASE INCIDENCE; IODINE; NEOPLASMS; PUBLIC HEALTH; RADIATIONS; STORAGE RINGS; SYNCHROTRONS; WIGGLER MAGNETS; XENON

Citation Formats

Giacomini, John C. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays. United States: N. p., 1996. Web. doi:10.2172/762052.
Giacomini, John C. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays. United States. doi:10.2172/762052.
Giacomini, John C. Tue . "K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays". United States. doi:10.2172/762052. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/762052.
@article{osti_762052,
title = {K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays},
author = {Giacomini, John C.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with relatively little morbidity. We extended the principles learned with coronary angiography to noninvasive imaging of the human bronchial tree. For these images, we utilized xenon as the contrast agent, as it has a K-edge very similar to that of iodine. In this case, there is no true competing diagnostic test, and pulmonary neoplasm is an enormous public health concern. In early experiments, we demonstrated remarkably clear images of the human bronchial tree. These images have been shown internationally; however, funding difficulties primarily with the Department of Energy have not allowed for progression of this promising avenue of research. One potential criticism of the project is that in order to obtain these images, we utilized national laboratories. Some have questioned whether this would lead to a practical imaging modality. However, we have shown that the technology exists to allow for construction of a miniature storage ring, with a superconducting wiggler magnet, which would occupy minimal space, and would be of a cost comparable with that of a clinical cardiac catheterization laboratory. Much of the focus of this research is now shifting to Europe, where individual whom we have trained or with whom we have worked are now heading up extensive efforts in medical imaging and K-edge dichromography. This work is occurring mostly at DESY in Hamburg, and at the European Synchrotrons Research Laboratory (ESRF) in Grenoble. (B204)},
doi = {10.2172/762052},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Tue Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

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