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Title: Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.

Abstract

For improved safety in and around the ARM SGP CART site, the ARM Program recently purchased and installed an aircraft detection radar system at the central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The new system will enhance safety measures already in place at the central facility. The SGP CART site, especially the central facility, houses several instruments employing laser technology. These instruments are designed to be eye-safe and are not a hazard to personnel at the site or pilots of low-flying aircraft over the site. However, some of the specialized equipment brought to the central facility by visiting scientists during scheduled intensive observation periods (IOPs) might use higher-power laser beams that point skyward to make measurements of clouds or aerosols in the atmosphere. If these beams were to strike the eye of a person in an aircraft flying above the instrument, damage to the person's eyesight could result. During IOPs, CART site personnel have obtained Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval to temporarily close the airspace directly over the central facility and keep aircraft from flying into the path of the instrument's laser beam. Information about the blocked airspace is easily transmitted to commercial aircraft, but that does not guarantee that the airspacemore » remains completely plane-free. For this reason, during IOPs in which non-eye-safe lasers were in use in the past, ARM technicians watched for low-flying aircraft in and around the airspace over the central facility. If the technicians spotted such an aircraft, they would manually trigger a safety shutter to block the laser beam's path skyward until the plane had cleared the area.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
761280
Report Number(s):
ANL/ER/NL-00-07
TRN: AH200030%%70
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 3 Aug 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; AEROSOLS; AIRCRAFT; CLIMATES; CLOUDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; DETECTION; OKLAHOMA; RADAR; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; US FAA; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Sisterson, D L, and Holdridge, D. J., ed. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/761280.
Sisterson, D L, & Holdridge, D. J., ed. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.. United States. doi:10.2172/761280.
Sisterson, D L, and Holdridge, D. J., ed. Thu . "Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.". United States. doi:10.2172/761280. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/761280.
@article{osti_761280,
title = {Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program facilities newsletter, July 2000.},
author = {Sisterson, D L and Holdridge, D. J., ed.},
abstractNote = {For improved safety in and around the ARM SGP CART site, the ARM Program recently purchased and installed an aircraft detection radar system at the central facility near Lamont, Oklahoma. The new system will enhance safety measures already in place at the central facility. The SGP CART site, especially the central facility, houses several instruments employing laser technology. These instruments are designed to be eye-safe and are not a hazard to personnel at the site or pilots of low-flying aircraft over the site. However, some of the specialized equipment brought to the central facility by visiting scientists during scheduled intensive observation periods (IOPs) might use higher-power laser beams that point skyward to make measurements of clouds or aerosols in the atmosphere. If these beams were to strike the eye of a person in an aircraft flying above the instrument, damage to the person's eyesight could result. During IOPs, CART site personnel have obtained Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval to temporarily close the airspace directly over the central facility and keep aircraft from flying into the path of the instrument's laser beam. Information about the blocked airspace is easily transmitted to commercial aircraft, but that does not guarantee that the airspace remains completely plane-free. For this reason, during IOPs in which non-eye-safe lasers were in use in the past, ARM technicians watched for low-flying aircraft in and around the airspace over the central facility. If the technicians spotted such an aircraft, they would manually trigger a safety shutter to block the laser beam's path skyward until the plane had cleared the area.},
doi = {10.2172/761280},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {8}
}

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