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Title: Use of Reactor-Produced Radioisotopes for Prevention Restenosis After Angioplasty

Abstract

Coronary heart disease leads to myocardial infarction and is a major cause of death in the US. Myocardial infarctions result from atherosclerotic plaque deposits in the coronary arteries, reducing blood flow through these arteries which supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle. The two major approaches for restoring adequate blood flow are coronary bypass graft surgery and coronary angioplasty. Angioplasty is a routinely used clinical procedure, where a deflated balloon attached to the end of a long catheter is inserted into an artery in the leg and then advanced through the aorta into the blocked regions of the coronary arteries. After positioning in the occluded region of the artery, the balloon is inflated with a pressurized saline solution which opens the artery restoring blood flow by pressing the atherosclerotic plaque into the vessel wall. Angioplasty is a widely performed procedure with the coronary arteries and is a much less expensive alternative to coronary bypass surgery. The best patients for angioplasty are those with single occlusions and this method is preferred over bypass grafting because of the significantly reduced expense. The reformation of plaque deposits in arteries (restenosis) following angioplasty, however, is a major clinical problem encountered in as highmore » as 40 percent of patients. Because reduction of health care costs is a major national priority, development of effective new preventative methods for restenoses is an important national priority.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (US)
OSTI Identifier:
760343
Report Number(s):
C/ORNL97-0468
TRN: US0005072
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 21 Dec 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BLOOD FLOW; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; PATIENTS; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIOTHERAPY

Citation Formats

Knapp, F.F., and Pipes, D.W. Use of Reactor-Produced Radioisotopes for Prevention Restenosis After Angioplasty. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/760343.
Knapp, F.F., & Pipes, D.W. Use of Reactor-Produced Radioisotopes for Prevention Restenosis After Angioplasty. United States. doi:10.2172/760343.
Knapp, F.F., and Pipes, D.W. Tue . "Use of Reactor-Produced Radioisotopes for Prevention Restenosis After Angioplasty". United States. doi:10.2172/760343. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/760343.
@article{osti_760343,
title = {Use of Reactor-Produced Radioisotopes for Prevention Restenosis After Angioplasty},
author = {Knapp, F.F. and Pipes, D.W.},
abstractNote = {Coronary heart disease leads to myocardial infarction and is a major cause of death in the US. Myocardial infarctions result from atherosclerotic plaque deposits in the coronary arteries, reducing blood flow through these arteries which supply oxygen and nutrients to the heart muscle. The two major approaches for restoring adequate blood flow are coronary bypass graft surgery and coronary angioplasty. Angioplasty is a routinely used clinical procedure, where a deflated balloon attached to the end of a long catheter is inserted into an artery in the leg and then advanced through the aorta into the blocked regions of the coronary arteries. After positioning in the occluded region of the artery, the balloon is inflated with a pressurized saline solution which opens the artery restoring blood flow by pressing the atherosclerotic plaque into the vessel wall. Angioplasty is a widely performed procedure with the coronary arteries and is a much less expensive alternative to coronary bypass surgery. The best patients for angioplasty are those with single occlusions and this method is preferred over bypass grafting because of the significantly reduced expense. The reformation of plaque deposits in arteries (restenosis) following angioplasty, however, is a major clinical problem encountered in as high as 40 percent of patients. Because reduction of health care costs is a major national priority, development of effective new preventative methods for restenoses is an important national priority.},
doi = {10.2172/760343},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {12}
}