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Title: High efficiency, quasi-instantaneous steam expansion device utilizing fossil or nuclear fuel as the heat source

Abstract

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a specially designed steam expansion device (heat cavity) was performed to prove the feasibility of steam expansions at elevated rates for power generation with higher efficiency. The steam expansion process inside the heat cavity greatly depends on the gap within which the steam expands and accelerates. This system can be seen as a miniaturized boiler integrated inside the expander where steam (or the proper fluid) is generated almost instantaneously prior to its expansion in the work-producing unit. Relatively cold water is pulsed inside the heat cavity, where the heat transferred causes the water to flash to steam, thereby increasing its specific volume by a large factor. The gap inside the heat cavity forms a special nozzle-shaped system in which the fluid expands rapidly, accelerating toward the system outlet. The expansion phenomenon is the cause of ever-increasing fluid speed inside the cavity system, eliminating the need for moving parts (pumps, valves, etc.). In fact, the subsequent velocity induced by the sudden fluid expansion causes turbulent conditions, forcing accelerating Reynolds and Nusselt numbers which, in turn, increase the convective heat transfer coefficient. When the combustion of fossil fuels constitutes the heat source, the heat cavity concept can be appliedmore » directly inside the stator of conventional turbines, thereby greatly increasing the overall system efficiency.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (US); Federal Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
760128
Report Number(s):
DE-FG26-98FT40359-01
TRN: US0004182
DOE Contract Number:  
FG26-98FT40359
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; STEAM GENERATORS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; HYDRODYNAMICS; THERMODYNAMICS; EXPANSION CHAMBERS; CONVECTION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

Claudio Filippone, Ph.D. High efficiency, quasi-instantaneous steam expansion device utilizing fossil or nuclear fuel as the heat source. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/760128.
Claudio Filippone, Ph.D. High efficiency, quasi-instantaneous steam expansion device utilizing fossil or nuclear fuel as the heat source. United States. doi:10.2172/760128.
Claudio Filippone, Ph.D. Tue . "High efficiency, quasi-instantaneous steam expansion device utilizing fossil or nuclear fuel as the heat source". United States. doi:10.2172/760128. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/760128.
@article{osti_760128,
title = {High efficiency, quasi-instantaneous steam expansion device utilizing fossil or nuclear fuel as the heat source},
author = {Claudio Filippone, Ph.D.},
abstractNote = {Thermal-hydraulic analysis of a specially designed steam expansion device (heat cavity) was performed to prove the feasibility of steam expansions at elevated rates for power generation with higher efficiency. The steam expansion process inside the heat cavity greatly depends on the gap within which the steam expands and accelerates. This system can be seen as a miniaturized boiler integrated inside the expander where steam (or the proper fluid) is generated almost instantaneously prior to its expansion in the work-producing unit. Relatively cold water is pulsed inside the heat cavity, where the heat transferred causes the water to flash to steam, thereby increasing its specific volume by a large factor. The gap inside the heat cavity forms a special nozzle-shaped system in which the fluid expands rapidly, accelerating toward the system outlet. The expansion phenomenon is the cause of ever-increasing fluid speed inside the cavity system, eliminating the need for moving parts (pumps, valves, etc.). In fact, the subsequent velocity induced by the sudden fluid expansion causes turbulent conditions, forcing accelerating Reynolds and Nusselt numbers which, in turn, increase the convective heat transfer coefficient. When the combustion of fossil fuels constitutes the heat source, the heat cavity concept can be applied directly inside the stator of conventional turbines, thereby greatly increasing the overall system efficiency.},
doi = {10.2172/760128},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {6}
}