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Title: Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999

Abstract

This is the fourth report in an ongoing series of studies examining how US perspectives about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era. In Volume 1 the authors present findings from a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public conducted from 13 September to 14 October 1999. Results are compared to findings from previous surveys in this series conducted in 1993, 1995, and 1997, and trends are analyzed. Key areas of investigation reported in Volume 1 include evolving perceptions of nuclear weapons risks and benefits, preferences for related policy and spending issues, and views about three emerging issue areas: deterrent utility of precision guided munitions; response options to attacks in which mass casualty weapons are used; and expectations about national missile defenses. In this volume they relate respondent beliefs about nuclear security to perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits and to policy preferences. They develop causal models to partially explain key preferences, and they employ cluster analysis to group respondents into four policy relevant clusters characterized by similar views and preferences about nuclear security within each cluster. Systematic links are found among respondent demographic characteristics, perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits, policy beliefs,more » and security policy and spending preferences. In Volume 2 they provide analysis of in-depth interviews with fifty members of the US security policy community.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
759443
Report Number(s):
SAND2000-1367
TRN: US0004697
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; MILITARY EQUIPMENT; MISSILES; NATIONAL SECURITY; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; PUBLIC ANXIETY; PUBLIC OPINION; NATIONAL DEFENSE

Citation Formats

HERRON,KERRY G., JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C., and HUGHES,SCOTT D. Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/759443.
HERRON,KERRY G., JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C., & HUGHES,SCOTT D. Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999. United States. doi:10.2172/759443.
HERRON,KERRY G., JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C., and HUGHES,SCOTT D. Thu . "Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999". United States. doi:10.2172/759443. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/759443.
@article{osti_759443,
title = {Mass and Elite Views on Nuclear Security: US National Security Surveys 1993-1999},
author = {HERRON,KERRY G. and JENKINS-SMITH,HANK C. and HUGHES,SCOTT D.},
abstractNote = {This is the fourth report in an ongoing series of studies examining how US perspectives about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era. In Volume 1 the authors present findings from a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public conducted from 13 September to 14 October 1999. Results are compared to findings from previous surveys in this series conducted in 1993, 1995, and 1997, and trends are analyzed. Key areas of investigation reported in Volume 1 include evolving perceptions of nuclear weapons risks and benefits, preferences for related policy and spending issues, and views about three emerging issue areas: deterrent utility of precision guided munitions; response options to attacks in which mass casualty weapons are used; and expectations about national missile defenses. In this volume they relate respondent beliefs about nuclear security to perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits and to policy preferences. They develop causal models to partially explain key preferences, and they employ cluster analysis to group respondents into four policy relevant clusters characterized by similar views and preferences about nuclear security within each cluster. Systematic links are found among respondent demographic characteristics, perceptions of nuclear risks and benefits, policy beliefs, and security policy and spending preferences. In Volume 2 they provide analysis of in-depth interviews with fifty members of the US security policy community.},
doi = {10.2172/759443},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}