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Title: Microchip device for liquid phase analysis

Abstract

The lab-on-a-chip concept has enabled miniature instruments to be developed that allow the rapid execution and automation of fluidic operations such as valving, separation, dilution, mixing, and flow splitting upon the proper application of a motive (driving) force. The integration of these simple operations to perform complete, multiple-step chemical assays is rapidly becoming a reality. Such compact, monolithic devices potentially enjoy advantages in speed, cost, automation, reagent consumption, and waste generation compared to existing laboratory-scale instruments. Initial reports of these microfluidic devices focused on combining various electrokinetically driven separation methods including microchip electrophoresis, gel electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and open channel electrochromatography (OCEC) with fluidic valving to introduce sample plugs into the separation channel. Other operations have quickly been integrated with the separations and fluidic valving on these microchips. For example, integrated devices with mixers/diluters for precolumn and postcolumn analyte derivatization, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) restriction digests, enzyme assays, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification have been added to the basic design. Integrated mixers that can perform solvent programming for both MEKC and OCEC have also been demonstrated. These examples are simple, yet powerful, demonstrations of the potential for lab-on-a-chip devices. In this report, three key areas for improved performancemore » of these devices are described: on-chip calibration techniques, enhanced separative performance, and enhanced detection capabilities.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Defense Programs (DP) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
758295
Report Number(s):
Y/NSP-305
TRN: AH200022%%84
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 May 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 42 ENGINEERING; MINIATURIZATION; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; PERFORMANCE; CALIBRATION; SEPARATION PROCESSES

Citation Formats

Ramsey, j.m. Microchip device for liquid phase analysis. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/758295.
Ramsey, j.m. Microchip device for liquid phase analysis. United States. doi:10.2172/758295.
Ramsey, j.m. Mon . "Microchip device for liquid phase analysis". United States. doi:10.2172/758295. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/758295.
@article{osti_758295,
title = {Microchip device for liquid phase analysis},
author = {Ramsey, j.m.},
abstractNote = {The lab-on-a-chip concept has enabled miniature instruments to be developed that allow the rapid execution and automation of fluidic operations such as valving, separation, dilution, mixing, and flow splitting upon the proper application of a motive (driving) force. The integration of these simple operations to perform complete, multiple-step chemical assays is rapidly becoming a reality. Such compact, monolithic devices potentially enjoy advantages in speed, cost, automation, reagent consumption, and waste generation compared to existing laboratory-scale instruments. Initial reports of these microfluidic devices focused on combining various electrokinetically driven separation methods including microchip electrophoresis, gel electrophoresis, micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) and open channel electrochromatography (OCEC) with fluidic valving to introduce sample plugs into the separation channel. Other operations have quickly been integrated with the separations and fluidic valving on these microchips. For example, integrated devices with mixers/diluters for precolumn and postcolumn analyte derivatization, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) restriction digests, enzyme assays, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification have been added to the basic design. Integrated mixers that can perform solvent programming for both MEKC and OCEC have also been demonstrated. These examples are simple, yet powerful, demonstrations of the potential for lab-on-a-chip devices. In this report, three key areas for improved performance of these devices are described: on-chip calibration techniques, enhanced separative performance, and enhanced detection capabilities.},
doi = {10.2172/758295},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}