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Title: Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications

Abstract

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried faultmore » east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
United States Geological Survey - Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Nevada Operations Office (US)
OSTI Identifier:
756587
Report Number(s):
Professional-Paper-1608
TRN: US200304%%424
DOE Contract Number:  
AI08-96NV11967
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 8 Jun 2000; PBD: 8 Jun 2000; PBD: 8 Jun 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CALDERAS; GEOLOGY; GROUND WATER; HOT SPRINGS; HYPOTHESIS; LITHOLOGY; MOUNTAINS; NEVADA TEST SITE; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; TECTONICS; TESTING; Geothermal Legacy; SOUTHWESTERN NEVADA; VOLCANIC FIELD; HYDROGEOLOGY; NEVADA; GEOPHYSICAL

Citation Formats

Grauch, V.J.S., Sawyer, D.A., Fridrich, C.J., and Hudson, M.R. Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/756587.
Grauch, V.J.S., Sawyer, D.A., Fridrich, C.J., & Hudson, M.R. Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications. United States. doi:10.2172/756587.
Grauch, V.J.S., Sawyer, D.A., Fridrich, C.J., and Hudson, M.R. Thu . "Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications". United States. doi:10.2172/756587. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/756587.
@article{osti_756587,
title = {Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications},
author = {Grauch, V.J.S. and Sawyer, D.A. and Fridrich, C.J. and Hudson, M.R.},
abstractNote = {Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.},
doi = {10.2172/756587},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {6}
}

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