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Title: Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.

Abstract

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-sevenmore » acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Asotin County Conservation District
Sponsoring Org.:
United States. Bonneville Power Administration.
OSTI Identifier:
756488
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-11185-1
Contract 98AP11185; Contract 98AP11197; Contract 97AP36971; Contract 97AP37439; TRN: US0003202
DOE Contract Number:  
1997AP36971
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jan 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
13 HYDRO ENERGY; HYDROELECTRIC POWER PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; FISHERIES; PRODUCTIVITY; COLUMBIA RIVER; SALMON; TROUT; HABITAT; WASHINGTON; WATERSHEDS; FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT - WASHINGTON (STATE); STREAM CONSERVATION - WASHINGTON (STATE); SEDIMENT CONTROL

Citation Formats

Johnson, Bradley J. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/756488.
Johnson, Bradley J. Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.. United States. doi:10.2172/756488.
Johnson, Bradley J. Mon . "Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.". United States. doi:10.2172/756488. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/756488.
@article{osti_756488,
title = {Habitat Projects Completed within the Asotin Creek Watershed, 1998 Completion Report.},
author = {Johnson, Bradley J},
abstractNote = {The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Program (ACMWP) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The Asotin Creek watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. Snake River spring chinook salmon, summer steelhead and bull trout, which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. The ACMWP began coordinating habitat projects in 1995. Approximately two hundred forty-six projects have been implemented through the ACMWP as of 1998. Fifty-nine of these projects were funded in part through Bonneville Power Administration's 1998 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. These projects used a variety of methods to enhance and protect watershed conditions. In-stream work for fish habitat included construction of hard structures (e.g. vortex rock weirs), meander reconstruction, placement of large woody debris (LWD) and whole trees and improvements to off-channel rearing habitat; one hundred thirty-nine pools were created with these structures. Three miles of stream benefited from riparian improvements such as fencing, vegetative plantings, and noxious weed control. Two alternative water developments were completed, providing off-stream-watering sources for livestock. 20,500 ft of upland terrace construction, seven sediment basin construction, one hundred eighty-seven acres of grass seeding, eight hundred fifty acres of direct seeding and eighteen sediment basin cleanouts were implemented to reduce sediment production and delivery to streams in the watershed.},
doi = {10.2172/756488},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {11}
}

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