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Title: A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies

Abstract

Disruptive technologies are scientific discoveries that break through the usual product technology capabilities and provide a basis for a new competitive paradigm as described by Anderson and Tushman [1990], Tushman and Rosenkopf [1992], and Bower and Christensen [1995]. Discontinuous innovations are products/processes/services that provide exponential improvements in the value received by the customer much in the same vein as Walsh [1996], Lynn, Morone and Paulson [1996], and Veryzer [1998]. For more on definitions of disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations, see Walsh and Linton [1999] who provide a number of definitions for disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations. Disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations present a unique challenge and opportunity for R and D organizations seeking to build their commercialization efforts and to reinvent the corporation. These technologies do not have a proven path from scientific discovery to mass production and therefore require novel approaches. These critically important technologies are the wellspring of wealth creation and new competency generation but are not readily accepted by the corporate community. They are alternatively embraced and eschewed by the commercial community. They are finally accepted when the technology has already affected the industry or when the technological horse has already flown out of the hanger. Manymore » firms, especially larger firms, seem reluctant to familiarize themselves with these technologies quickly. The trend seems to be that these firms prefer to react to a proven disruptive technology that has changed the product market paradigm. If true, then there is cause for concern. This paper will review the literature on disruptive technologies presenting a model of the progression from scientific idea to mass production for disruptive technologies contrasted to the more copious incremental technologies. The paper will then describe Sandia National Laboratories' involvement in one of the disruptive technology areas, namely micro-electromechanical systems (sometimes referred to as Microsystems or MEMS) and will survey a number of companies that have investigated Sandia's technological discoveries for potential use in an industrial capacity. The survey will focus on the movement of the research findings from the laboratory into the marketplace and all of the problem areas that disruptive technologies face in this arena. The paper will then state several hypotheses that will be tested. The data will be described with results and conclusions reported.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
756414
Report Number(s):
SAND2000-1389C
TRN: AH200022%%38
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE International Conference on Commercialization of MEMS, Santa Fe, NM (US), 09/06/2000--09/08/2000; Other Information: PBD: 17 May 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 42 ENGINEERING; MINIATURIZATION; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS; COMMERCIALIZATION; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; INDUSTRY

Citation Formats

KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K., WALSH, STEVE, MCWHORTER,PAUL J., CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C., WILLIAMS,W. DAVID, and ROMIG JR.,ALTON D. A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K., WALSH, STEVE, MCWHORTER,PAUL J., CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C., WILLIAMS,W. DAVID, & ROMIG JR.,ALTON D. A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies. United States.
KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K., WALSH, STEVE, MCWHORTER,PAUL J., CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C., WILLIAMS,W. DAVID, and ROMIG JR.,ALTON D. Wed . "A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/756414.
@article{osti_756414,
title = {A model for technology assessment and commercialization for innovative disruptive technologies},
author = {KASSICIEH, SULEIMAN K. and WALSH, STEVE and MCWHORTER,PAUL J. and CUMMINGS JR.,JOHN C. and WILLIAMS,W. DAVID and ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.},
abstractNote = {Disruptive technologies are scientific discoveries that break through the usual product technology capabilities and provide a basis for a new competitive paradigm as described by Anderson and Tushman [1990], Tushman and Rosenkopf [1992], and Bower and Christensen [1995]. Discontinuous innovations are products/processes/services that provide exponential improvements in the value received by the customer much in the same vein as Walsh [1996], Lynn, Morone and Paulson [1996], and Veryzer [1998]. For more on definitions of disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations, see Walsh and Linton [1999] who provide a number of definitions for disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations. Disruptive technologies and discontinuous innovations present a unique challenge and opportunity for R and D organizations seeking to build their commercialization efforts and to reinvent the corporation. These technologies do not have a proven path from scientific discovery to mass production and therefore require novel approaches. These critically important technologies are the wellspring of wealth creation and new competency generation but are not readily accepted by the corporate community. They are alternatively embraced and eschewed by the commercial community. They are finally accepted when the technology has already affected the industry or when the technological horse has already flown out of the hanger. Many firms, especially larger firms, seem reluctant to familiarize themselves with these technologies quickly. The trend seems to be that these firms prefer to react to a proven disruptive technology that has changed the product market paradigm. If true, then there is cause for concern. This paper will review the literature on disruptive technologies presenting a model of the progression from scientific idea to mass production for disruptive technologies contrasted to the more copious incremental technologies. The paper will then describe Sandia National Laboratories' involvement in one of the disruptive technology areas, namely micro-electromechanical systems (sometimes referred to as Microsystems or MEMS) and will survey a number of companies that have investigated Sandia's technological discoveries for potential use in an industrial capacity. The survey will focus on the movement of the research findings from the laboratory into the marketplace and all of the problem areas that disruptive technologies face in this arena. The paper will then state several hypotheses that will be tested. The data will be described with results and conclusions reported.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}

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