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Title: Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.

Abstract

Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg inmore » 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
755893
Report Number(s):
ANL/DIS/CP-102040
TRN: US0003453
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6th International Conference on Acidic Deposition, Tsukuba (JP), 12/10/2000--12/16/2000; Other Information: PBD: 31 May 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; ASIA; AIR POLLUTION; ACID RAIN; DEPOSITION; SULFUR DIOXIDE; NITROGEN OXIDES; EMISSION; R CODES; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION

Citation Formats

Streets, D. G., Tsai, N. Y., Akimoto, H., and Oka, K. Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
Streets, D. G., Tsai, N. Y., Akimoto, H., & Oka, K. Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.. United States.
Streets, D. G., Tsai, N. Y., Akimoto, H., and Oka, K. Wed . "Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/755893.
@article{osti_755893,
title = {Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.},
author = {Streets, D. G. and Tsai, N. Y. and Akimoto, H. and Oka, K.},
abstractNote = {Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}

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