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Title: Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry

Abstract

Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
755470
Report Number(s):
SAND99-0119J(Final)
TRN: US200201%%489
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology
Additional Journal Information:
Other Information: Supercedes report DE00755470; Submitted to Journal of Contaminant Hydrology; PBD: 4 May 2000; PBD: 4 May 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CHEMISTRY; GEOCHEMISTRY; KINETIC EQUATIONS; KINETICS; METABOLISM; ORGANIC MATTER; RADIOISOTOPES; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; REDOX REACTIONS; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

WANG,YIFENG, and PAPENGUTH,HANS W. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
WANG,YIFENG, & PAPENGUTH,HANS W. Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry. United States.
WANG,YIFENG, and PAPENGUTH,HANS W. Thu . "Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/755470.
@article{osti_755470,
title = {Kinetic modeling of microbially-driven redox chemistry of radionuclides in subsurface environments: Coupling transport, microbial metabolism and geochemistry},
author = {WANG,YIFENG and PAPENGUTH,HANS W.},
abstractNote = {Microbial degradation of organic matter is a driving force in many subsurface geochemical systems, and therefore may have significant impacts on the fate of radionuclides released into subsurface environments. In this paper, the authors present a general reaction-transport model for microbial metabolism, redox chemistry, and radionuclide migration in subsurface systems. The model explicitly accounts for biomass accumulation and the coupling of radionuclide redox reactions with major biogeochemical processes. Based on the consideration that the biomass accumulation in subsurface environments is likely to achieve a quasi-steady state, they have accordingly modified the traditional microbial growth kinetic equation. They justified the use of the biogeochemical models without the explicit representation of biomass accumulation, if the interest of modeling is in the net impact of microbial reactions on geochemical processes. They then applied their model to a scenario in which an oxic water flow containing both uranium and completing organic ligands is recharged into an oxic aquifer in a carbonate formation. The model simulation shows that uranium can be reduced and therefore immobilized in the anoxic zone created by microbial degradation.},
doi = {},
journal = {Journal of Contaminant Hydrology},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}