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Title: Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface

Abstract

The U.S. Dept of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) contains nearly 10,000 strains of microorganisms isolated from terrestrial subsurface environments. Many of the aerobic, gram-negative, chemoheterotrophs isolated from the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) have previously been identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene nucleotide sequences. These SMCC isolates are currently being examined using Biolog GN Microplates and the Biolog Microstation System in order to gain knowledge of their metabolic capabilities and to compare Biolog IDs with 16S IDs. To accommodate the particular needs of these subsurface isolates, which are often incapable of growing under high-nutrient conditions, Biolog's recommendations for inoculating isolates into Biolog GN Microplates have been altered. The isolates are grown on low nutrient media, sodium thioglycolate (3mM) is added to the culture media to inhibit capsule formation, and a low density of bacteria is inoculated into the microplate. Using these altered inoculation criteria, 60 percent of these SMCC isolates have a Biolog genus ID that matches the 16S rRNA ID. These results indicate that the Biolog System can be a good means of identifying unusual environmental isolates, even when recommended inoculation procedures are altered to accommodate particular isolate needs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Site (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
754656
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-2000-00306
TRN: AH200016%%122
DOE Contract Number:  
AC09-96SR18500
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 100th ASM General Meeting, Los Angeles, CA (US), 05/21/2000--05/25/2000; Other Information: PBD: 5 May 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; UNDERGROUND; MICROORGANISMS; RIBOSOMAL RNA; NUCLEOTIDES; GENES; METABOLISM; BIODEGRADATION; REMEDIAL ACTION

Citation Formats

McKinsey, P.C. Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface. United States: N. p., 2000. Web.
McKinsey, P.C. Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface. United States.
McKinsey, P.C. Fri . "Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/754656.
@article{osti_754656,
title = {Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface},
author = {McKinsey, P.C.},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Dept of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) contains nearly 10,000 strains of microorganisms isolated from terrestrial subsurface environments. Many of the aerobic, gram-negative, chemoheterotrophs isolated from the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) have previously been identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene nucleotide sequences. These SMCC isolates are currently being examined using Biolog GN Microplates and the Biolog Microstation System in order to gain knowledge of their metabolic capabilities and to compare Biolog IDs with 16S IDs. To accommodate the particular needs of these subsurface isolates, which are often incapable of growing under high-nutrient conditions, Biolog's recommendations for inoculating isolates into Biolog GN Microplates have been altered. The isolates are grown on low nutrient media, sodium thioglycolate (3mM) is added to the culture media to inhibit capsule formation, and a low density of bacteria is inoculated into the microplate. Using these altered inoculation criteria, 60 percent of these SMCC isolates have a Biolog genus ID that matches the 16S rRNA ID. These results indicate that the Biolog System can be a good means of identifying unusual environmental isolates, even when recommended inoculation procedures are altered to accommodate particular isolate needs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2000},
month = {5}
}

Conference:
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