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Title: Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA

Abstract

The goal of the project was to develop a wireless communications system, including communications, command, and control software, to remotely monitor the environmental state of a process or facility. Proof of performance would be tested and evaluated with a prototype demonstration in a functioning facility. AR Designs' participation provided access to software resources and products that enable network communications for real-time embedded systems to access remote workstation services such as Graphical User Interface (GUI), file I/O, Events, Video, Audio, etc. in a standardized manner. This industrial partner further provided knowledge and links with applications and current industry practices. FM and T's responsibility was primarily in hardware development in areas such as advanced sensors, wireless radios, communication interfaces, and monitoring and analysis of sensor data. This role included a capability to design, fabricate, and test prototypes and to provide a demonstration environment to test a proposed remote sensing system. A summary of technical accomplishments is given.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
752802
Report Number(s):
KCP-613-6311; CRADA 98KCP1065
TRN: AH200114%%291
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00613
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 30 Mar 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEMS; DESIGN; MONITORING; PERFORMANCE; REMOTE SENSING; ON-LINE MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS; RADIO EQUIPMENT; PROCESS CONTROL; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

Citation Formats

Hensley, R.D. Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA. United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/752802.
Hensley, R.D. Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA. United States. doi:10.2172/752802.
Hensley, R.D. 2000. "Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA". United States. doi:10.2172/752802. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/752802.
@article{osti_752802,
title = {Remote Environmental Monitoring System CRADA},
author = {Hensley, R.D.},
abstractNote = {The goal of the project was to develop a wireless communications system, including communications, command, and control software, to remotely monitor the environmental state of a process or facility. Proof of performance would be tested and evaluated with a prototype demonstration in a functioning facility. AR Designs' participation provided access to software resources and products that enable network communications for real-time embedded systems to access remote workstation services such as Graphical User Interface (GUI), file I/O, Events, Video, Audio, etc. in a standardized manner. This industrial partner further provided knowledge and links with applications and current industry practices. FM and T's responsibility was primarily in hardware development in areas such as advanced sensors, wireless radios, communication interfaces, and monitoring and analysis of sensor data. This role included a capability to design, fabricate, and test prototypes and to provide a demonstration environment to test a proposed remote sensing system. A summary of technical accomplishments is given.},
doi = {10.2172/752802},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2000,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:

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