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Title: DIII-D dust particulate characterization (June 1998 Vent)

Abstract

Dust is a key component of fusion power device accident source term. Understanding the amount of dust expected in fusion power devices and its physical and chemical characteristics is needed to verify assumptions currently used in safety analyses. An important part of this safety research and development work is to characterize dust from existing experimental tokamaks. In this report, the authors present the collection, data analysis methods used, and the characterization of dust particulate collected from various locations inside the General Atomics DIII-D vacuum vessel following the June 1998 vent. The collected particulate was analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Two methods were used to collect particulate with the goal of preserving the particle size distribution and physical characteristics of the particulate. Choice of collection technique is important because the sampling method used can bias the particle size distribution collected. Vacuum collection on substrates and adhesion removal with metallurgical replicating tape were chosen as non-intrusive sampling methods. Seventeen samples were collected including plasma facing surfaces in lower, upper, and horizontal locations, surfaces behind floor tiles, surfaces behind divert or tiles, and surfaces behind ceiling tiles. The results of the analysis are presented.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
752359
Report Number(s):
INEEL/EXT-99-00095
TRN: US0001359
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-94ID13223
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jan 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; DOUBLET-3 DEVICE; ACCIDENTS; SOURCE TERMS; SAFETY ANALYSIS; DUSTS; DATA ANALYSIS; VACUUM SYSTEMS; PARTICLE SIZE; SAMPLING; FUSION POWER DEVICE; DUST; SAFETY ANALYSES; TOKAMAKS; PARTICULATE; DIII-D VACUUM VESSEL; PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION; PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS; VACUUM COLLECTION; ADHESION REMOVAL; PLASMA FACING

Citation Formats

Carmack, W.J. DIII-D dust particulate characterization (June 1998 Vent). United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/752359.
Carmack, W.J. DIII-D dust particulate characterization (June 1998 Vent). United States. doi:10.2172/752359.
Carmack, W.J. Fri . "DIII-D dust particulate characterization (June 1998 Vent)". United States. doi:10.2172/752359. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/752359.
@article{osti_752359,
title = {DIII-D dust particulate characterization (June 1998 Vent)},
author = {Carmack, W.J.},
abstractNote = {Dust is a key component of fusion power device accident source term. Understanding the amount of dust expected in fusion power devices and its physical and chemical characteristics is needed to verify assumptions currently used in safety analyses. An important part of this safety research and development work is to characterize dust from existing experimental tokamaks. In this report, the authors present the collection, data analysis methods used, and the characterization of dust particulate collected from various locations inside the General Atomics DIII-D vacuum vessel following the June 1998 vent. The collected particulate was analyzed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Two methods were used to collect particulate with the goal of preserving the particle size distribution and physical characteristics of the particulate. Choice of collection technique is important because the sampling method used can bias the particle size distribution collected. Vacuum collection on substrates and adhesion removal with metallurgical replicating tape were chosen as non-intrusive sampling methods. Seventeen samples were collected including plasma facing surfaces in lower, upper, and horizontal locations, surfaces behind floor tiles, surfaces behind divert or tiles, and surfaces behind ceiling tiles. The results of the analysis are presented.},
doi = {10.2172/752359},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {1}
}