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Title: LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99)

Abstract

Two new failure analysis techniques have been developed for backside and front side localization of open and shorted interconnections on ICs. These scanning optical microscopy techniques take advantage of the interactions between IC defects and localized heating using a focused infrared laser ({lambda} = 1,340 nm). Images are produced by monitoring the voltage changes across a constant current supply used to power the IC as the laser beam is scanned across the sample. The methods utilize the Seebeck Effect to localize open interconnections and Thermally-Induced Voltage Alteration (TIVA) to detect shorts. Initial investigations demonstrated the feasibility of TIVA and Seebeck Effect Imaging (SEI). Subsequent improvements have greatly increased the sensitivity of the TIVA/SEI system, reducing the acquisition times by more than 20X and localizing previously unobserved defects. The interaction physics describing the signal generation process and several examples demonstrating the localization of opens and shorts are described. Operational guidelines and limitations are also discussed. The system improvements, non-linear response of IC defects to heating, modeling of laser heating and examples using the improved system for failure analysis are presented.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Energy (US)
OSTI Identifier:
750173
Report Number(s):
SAND2000-0025
TRN: AH200007%%63
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1 Jan 2000
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTRICAL FAULTS; OPTICAL MICROSCOPY; OPERATION; RECOMMENDATIONS; DEFECTS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; TESTING

Citation Formats

Cole, E.I. Jr., Tangyunyong, P., Benson, D.A., and Barton, D.L. LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99). United States: N. p., 2000. Web. doi:10.2172/750173.
Cole, E.I. Jr., Tangyunyong, P., Benson, D.A., & Barton, D.L. LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99). United States. doi:10.2172/750173.
Cole, E.I. Jr., Tangyunyong, P., Benson, D.A., and Barton, D.L. Sat . "LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99)". United States. doi:10.2172/750173. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/750173.
@article{osti_750173,
title = {LDRD final report backside localization of open and shorted IC interconnections LDRD Project (FY98 and FY 99)},
author = {Cole, E.I. Jr. and Tangyunyong, P. and Benson, D.A. and Barton, D.L.},
abstractNote = {Two new failure analysis techniques have been developed for backside and front side localization of open and shorted interconnections on ICs. These scanning optical microscopy techniques take advantage of the interactions between IC defects and localized heating using a focused infrared laser ({lambda} = 1,340 nm). Images are produced by monitoring the voltage changes across a constant current supply used to power the IC as the laser beam is scanned across the sample. The methods utilize the Seebeck Effect to localize open interconnections and Thermally-Induced Voltage Alteration (TIVA) to detect shorts. Initial investigations demonstrated the feasibility of TIVA and Seebeck Effect Imaging (SEI). Subsequent improvements have greatly increased the sensitivity of the TIVA/SEI system, reducing the acquisition times by more than 20X and localizing previously unobserved defects. The interaction physics describing the signal generation process and several examples demonstrating the localization of opens and shorts are described. Operational guidelines and limitations are also discussed. The system improvements, non-linear response of IC defects to heating, modeling of laser heating and examples using the improved system for failure analysis are presented.},
doi = {10.2172/750173},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2000},
month = {Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2000}
}

Technical Report:

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