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Title: Load management: ''The shoe should fit the foot''. [Public acceptance of rate management]

Abstract

The electric utility industry may have to face even more troubled times than the present unless it successfully takes on the job of explaining its role to the public. People outside the industry do not understand the tight regulatory control on utility earnings, why per unit rates go up when they reduce consumption, and why the utilities use general conservation as a rationale for rate increases; they do not understand why generating reserves are currently high, and will understand even less well if reserves become low and there is a return to voltage reductions and the threat of rotating blackouts; also, they do not understand why delivery of steady high-voltage power, in large quantities around the clock, is less expensive than delivery of small quantities of low-voltage power to homeowners in whatever quantity and at whatever time they want it. Fuel or energy adjustment clauses are completely misunderstood, there is a serious lack of understanding of curtailable and other load management rates, and no one outside the industry appears to recognize that the money for time-of-day meters would eventually have to come from consumers. The meter investment would be part of the rate base and recording demand meters could raisemore » certain residential rates drastically. It is not sufficient for the industry to explain all of these things to itself in its own trade journals and symposia, nor is it sufficient for the industry to explain the matter to legislators and leave on them the burden of explaining to their constituents. If the American electric utility industry wishes to continue in its present form, then it should rapidly recognize that its long-range interests call for spending large sums on public education. (from Conclusions)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA
OSTI Identifier:
7361842
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Public Util. Fortn.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 97:12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; ELECTRIC POWER; ECONOMICS; LOAD MANAGEMENT; PUBLIC UTILITIES; CHARGES; CONSUMPTION RATES; EDUCATION; ENERGY CONSERVATION; MANAGEMENT; POWER GENERATION; POWER PLANTS; PROFITS; PUBLIC RELATIONS; POWER; 296000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Electric Power; 290200 - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology; 200106 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Economics

Citation Formats

Sherry, E V. Load management: ''The shoe should fit the foot''. [Public acceptance of rate management]. United States: N. p., 1976. Web.
Sherry, E V. Load management: ''The shoe should fit the foot''. [Public acceptance of rate management]. United States.
Sherry, E V. Thu . "Load management: ''The shoe should fit the foot''. [Public acceptance of rate management]". United States.
@article{osti_7361842,
title = {Load management: ''The shoe should fit the foot''. [Public acceptance of rate management]},
author = {Sherry, E V},
abstractNote = {The electric utility industry may have to face even more troubled times than the present unless it successfully takes on the job of explaining its role to the public. People outside the industry do not understand the tight regulatory control on utility earnings, why per unit rates go up when they reduce consumption, and why the utilities use general conservation as a rationale for rate increases; they do not understand why generating reserves are currently high, and will understand even less well if reserves become low and there is a return to voltage reductions and the threat of rotating blackouts; also, they do not understand why delivery of steady high-voltage power, in large quantities around the clock, is less expensive than delivery of small quantities of low-voltage power to homeowners in whatever quantity and at whatever time they want it. Fuel or energy adjustment clauses are completely misunderstood, there is a serious lack of understanding of curtailable and other load management rates, and no one outside the industry appears to recognize that the money for time-of-day meters would eventually have to come from consumers. The meter investment would be part of the rate base and recording demand meters could raise certain residential rates drastically. It is not sufficient for the industry to explain all of these things to itself in its own trade journals and symposia, nor is it sufficient for the industry to explain the matter to legislators and leave on them the burden of explaining to their constituents. If the American electric utility industry wishes to continue in its present form, then it should rapidly recognize that its long-range interests call for spending large sums on public education. (from Conclusions)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7361842}, journal = {Public Util. Fortn.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 97:12,
place = {United States},
year = {1976},
month = {6}
}