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Title: Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing

Abstract

This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7308724
Report Number(s):
PNL-8277
ON: DE92019316
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; HFIR REACTOR; PRESSURE VESSELS; ACOUSTIC EMISSION TESTING; CRACK PROPAGATION; EMBRITTLEMENT; HYDROSTATICS; LEAKS; MONITORING; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; PROGRESS REPORT; STEELS; ACOUSTIC TESTING; ALLOYS; CONTAINERS; DOCUMENT TYPES; ENRICHED URANIUM REACTORS; IRON ALLOYS; IRON BASE ALLOYS; IRRADIATION REACTORS; ISOTOPE PRODUCTION REACTORS; MATERIALS TESTING; NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING; RADIATION EFFECTS; REACTORS; RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS; RESEARCH REACTORS; TANK TYPE REACTORS; TEST REACTORS; TESTING; THERMAL REACTORS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; WATER MODERATED REACTORS; 220600* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Research, Test & Experimental Reactors; 360103 - Metals & Alloys- Mechanical Properties; 360105 - Metals & Alloys- Corrosion & Erosion; 420500 - Engineering- Materials Testing

Citation Formats

Friesel, M.A., and Dawson, J.F. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.2172/7308724.
Friesel, M.A., & Dawson, J.F. Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing. United States. doi:10.2172/7308724.
Friesel, M.A., and Dawson, J.F. 1992. "Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing". United States. doi:10.2172/7308724. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7308724.
@article{osti_7308724,
title = {Acoustic emission monitoring of HFIR vessel during hydrostatic testing},
author = {Friesel, M.A. and Dawson, J.F.},
abstractNote = {This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.},
doi = {10.2172/7308724},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report discusses the results and conclusions reached from applying acoustic emission monitoring to surveillance of the High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel during pressure testing. The objective of the monitoring was to detect crack growth and/or fluid leakage should it occur during the pressure test. The report addresses the approach, acoustic emission instrumentation, installation, calibration, and test results.
  • Through the cooperation of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has installed instrumentation on Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 for the purpose of test and evaluation of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of nuclear reactor pressure vessels and piping for flaw detection. This report describes the acoustic emission monitoring performed during the ASME Section III hydrostatic testing of Watts Bar Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 and the results obtained. Highlights of the results are: • Spontaneous AE was detected from a nozzle area during final pressurization. • Evaluation of the apparent source of the spontaneous AE using anmore » empirically derived AE/fracture mechanics relationship agreed within a factor of two with an evaluation by ASME Section XI Code procedures. • AE was detected from a fracture specimen which was pressure coupled to the 10-inch accumulator nozzle. This provided reassurance of adequate system sensitivity. • High background noise was observed when all four reactor coolant pumps were operating. Work is continuing at Watts Bar Unit 1 toward AE monitoring hot functional testing and subsequently monitoring during reactor operation.« less
  • A cross-hole high-frequency acoustic investigation of a granitic rock mass subjected to sustained heating is reported. Compressional and shear-wave velocity measurements along four different paths between four vertical boreholes were made prior to turning on the heater, during 398 days of heating, and after the heater was turned off. These measurements correlated well with the presence of fracture zones, in which the fractures were closed by thermal expansion of the rock upon heating. When the rock mass cooled, the velocity measurements indicated a greater intensity of fracturing than had existed before heating. Laboratory compressional and shear-wave velocity measurements were alsomore » made on intact rock specimens obtained from the site and subjected to axial stress. When used to interpret the increases in velocities measured in the field upon heating the rock mass, these measurements implied increases in horizontal normal stresses to between 30 and 40 MPa. Increases in these magnitudes agree with stress measurements made by the other techniques. The ratio of measured compressional to shear-wave velocity appears to provide a sensitive measure of the fraction of crack porosity containing water or gas.« less
  • Periodic hydrostatic proof testing and probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses are performed to demonstrate the structural integrity and useful life of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel. Calculations of the hydro-test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) and of the probability of failure account for vessel degradation (flaw growth and radiation-induced embrittlement) that takes place between tests and of the credible worst-case-operating condition. The specified useful life of the vessel is limited by specified maximum permissible calculated probabilities of failure for hydro-test and worst-case-operating conditions. The probability of failure can be calculated with or without accounting for the success (absencemore » of failure) of a test, but if success is accounted for, the calculated probabilities are less and thus the maximum permissible life greater. This report describes a simple method for including the success of a test.« less
  • The acoustic emission monitoring and corroborative ultrasonic examination of the acoustic emission (AE) locations established during the hydrostatic pressure test of a BWR primary pressure vessel is described. Descriptive information regarding AE is provided as a background and details of the AE and ultrasonic instrumentation, procedures, problems encountered, and test results are discussed. In total, 42 acoustic emission locations were detected, located, and ultrasonically examined during this project. At all 42 AE locations ultrasonic indications were obtained. Of the AE locations, 76% (or 32 of the 42) were confirmed at amplitudes greater than or equal to 2.5% Distance Amplitude Correctionmore » (DAC) by either L-wave or shear wave ultrasonic examination, the largest of these being 18% DAC. The remainder of the AE locations were confirmed at amplitudes less than 2.5% DAC. ASME Code requires that ultrasonic examination record for permanent reference indications of 50% DAC or greater. As is to be expected ultrasonic examination detected examinations which were not located by AE monitoring since AE locates only active flaws. Results show the complementary value of AE monitoring to ultrasonic examination in two primary uses: determining the existence and the location of active discontinuities; and assuring that active discontinuities are not overlooked. Results reflect the position that AE monitoring and ultrasonics are supplementary to each other, not replacements for one another.« less