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Title: Energy: technology for self-sufficiency

Abstract

The energy requirements of the United States, even from the most conservative estimate, are enormous. A reduction in the energy requirements can come about only by a decrease in both population growth, and the per capita energy consumption, and a change in the preferences for energy forms. For the next 30 to 50 years, continued heavy use will have to be made of the fossil fuels, particularly coal, as nuclear fission power system developments will come too slowly. Processes for the gasification and solvent refining of coal to produce clean fuels will have to be commercialized as soon as possible. Advanced combined cycle systems to improve thermodynamic efficiencies of energy transformation systems will have to be developed and commercialized with great rapidity to ensure economical utilization of the fossil fuels. The nuclear fission power systems will have to evolve from the present light water reactors to the full use of some commercial form of the breeder reactor to ensure an adequate and economical supply of nuclear fuel beyond 2000. The research and technological development of nuclear fusion should be accelerated such that a commercial nuclear fusion power plant could be achieved around 2000. The main deterrents to the use ofmore » solar energy for power production are: low intensity of the irradiation, the susceptibility to cloud cover in most areas; the sensitivity to geographical locations; and the inability at present to store large amounts of energy. The exploitation of geothermal energy will require much research and even then, the conversion efficiencies are only about 15 percent. A low cost method of storing energy in large quantities is needed. Electrochemical storage may be accomplished in a battery, pumped water, thermal, mechanical as in a flywheel, or in the production of a fuel such as hydrogen. These are briefly discussed. 36 references. (MCW)« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Combustion Engineering, Inc., Stamford, CT (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7306459
Report Number(s):
NP-22229
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENERGY MANAGEMENT; DEMAND FACTORS; ENERGY SOURCE DEVELOPMENT; PLANNING; USA; ENERGY SUPPLIES; COMMERCIALIZATION; ECOLOGY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENERGY SHORTAGES; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; GROWTH; POPULATION DYNAMICS; PUBLIC OPINION; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; MANAGEMENT; NORTH AMERICA; 292000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Supply, Demand & Forecasting

Citation Formats

Drake, Jr, R M. Energy: technology for self-sufficiency. United States: N. p., 1973. Web.
Drake, Jr, R M. Energy: technology for self-sufficiency. United States.
Drake, Jr, R M. Mon . "Energy: technology for self-sufficiency". United States.
@article{osti_7306459,
title = {Energy: technology for self-sufficiency},
author = {Drake, Jr, R M},
abstractNote = {The energy requirements of the United States, even from the most conservative estimate, are enormous. A reduction in the energy requirements can come about only by a decrease in both population growth, and the per capita energy consumption, and a change in the preferences for energy forms. For the next 30 to 50 years, continued heavy use will have to be made of the fossil fuels, particularly coal, as nuclear fission power system developments will come too slowly. Processes for the gasification and solvent refining of coal to produce clean fuels will have to be commercialized as soon as possible. Advanced combined cycle systems to improve thermodynamic efficiencies of energy transformation systems will have to be developed and commercialized with great rapidity to ensure economical utilization of the fossil fuels. The nuclear fission power systems will have to evolve from the present light water reactors to the full use of some commercial form of the breeder reactor to ensure an adequate and economical supply of nuclear fuel beyond 2000. The research and technological development of nuclear fusion should be accelerated such that a commercial nuclear fusion power plant could be achieved around 2000. The main deterrents to the use of solar energy for power production are: low intensity of the irradiation, the susceptibility to cloud cover in most areas; the sensitivity to geographical locations; and the inability at present to store large amounts of energy. The exploitation of geothermal energy will require much research and even then, the conversion efficiencies are only about 15 percent. A low cost method of storing energy in large quantities is needed. Electrochemical storage may be accomplished in a battery, pumped water, thermal, mechanical as in a flywheel, or in the production of a fuel such as hydrogen. These are briefly discussed. 36 references. (MCW)},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7306459}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1973},
month = {1}
}

Technical Report:
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