skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Physics of climate

Abstract

Physics of Climate is a suitable text for at least part of a general circulation course. The quantity and quality of information in this book are such that anyone involved in the study of the atmosphere or climate will wish to have it handy. In particular, anyone working with a general circulation model will want to see how his model compares with the observed world. Eight chapters are the core of the text. They cover: data description; observed states of the atmosphere, ocean, and cryosphere; exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface; and the budgets of water, angular momentum, and energy.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7287064
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7287064
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Other Information: From review by Walter Robinson, Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in Bulletin of the American Meterological Society, Vol. 73, No. 11, (Nov 1992)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CLIMATES; PHYSICS; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; GENERAL CIRCULATION MODELS; REVIEWS; DOCUMENT TYPES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS 540110*

Citation Formats

Peixoto, J.P., and Oort, A.H. Physics of climate. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Peixoto, J.P., & Oort, A.H. Physics of climate. United States.
Peixoto, J.P., and Oort, A.H. Wed . "Physics of climate". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7287064,
title = {Physics of climate},
author = {Peixoto, J.P. and Oort, A.H.},
abstractNote = {Physics of Climate is a suitable text for at least part of a general circulation course. The quantity and quality of information in this book are such that anyone involved in the study of the atmosphere or climate will wish to have it handy. In particular, anyone working with a general circulation model will want to see how his model compares with the observed world. Eight chapters are the core of the text. They cover: data description; observed states of the atmosphere, ocean, and cryosphere; exchanges between the atmosphere and the surface; and the budgets of water, angular momentum, and energy.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Water resources are sensitive to climate variability and change; predictions of seasonal to interannual climate variations and projections of long-term climate trends can provide significant values in managing water resources. This study examines the control (1975–1995) and future (1995–2100) climate simulated by a global climate model (GCM) and a regional climate simulation driven by the GCM control simulation for the U.S. Comparison of the regional climate simulation with observations across 13 subregions showed that the simulation captured the seasonality and the distributions of precipitation rate quite well. The GCM control and climate change simulations showed that, as a result ofmore » a 1% increase in greenhouse gas concentrations per year, there will be a warming of 2–3°C across the U.S. from 2000 to 2100. Although precipitation is not projected to change during this century, the warming trend will increase evapotranspiration to reduce annual basin mean runoff over five subregions along the coastal and south-central U.S.« less
  • Starting with the US-USSR Agreement on Protection of the Environment signed in 1972, the two nations have cooperated in joint research on atmospheric and environmental problems. The result of these efforts has been an innovative approach to projecting future climate change based on what has been learned about past warm periods and what can be learned from models. The chapters in this document explore the following: past changes in climate, both paleoclimatology and changes in the recent past; changes in atmospheric composition; estimates of greenhouse-induced change including the use of both empirical methods and climate models; impacts of climate changemore » on water resources and agriculture in the two countries; and prospects for future climate changes.« less
  • A collection of essays assess recent climate shifts, and the possibilities of human-induced climate alterations such as a long-term global warming derived from the enrichment of the atmospheric content of the 'greenhouse' gases. Contributors cover climatic variability and change, identifying climate sensitivity, the biophysical impacts of agriculture, fisheries, pastoralism, water resources, and energy resources, and social and economic impacts and adjustments.
  • Problems related to the effects of extreme climatic events - such as droughts, floods, or severe cold - are a continual burden to economies and societies in many parts of the world. Moreover, with growing evidence that increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases may be altering the Earth's climate, these problems seem likely to be exacerbated. Thus, it is incumbent upon the scientific community to develop and refine effective methods of assessing the impacts of climatic variations on society.
  • This paper outlines the different methods which may be used for the construction of regional climate change scenarios. The main focus of the paper is the construction of global climate change scenarios from climate change experiments carried out using General Circulation Models (GCMS) An introduction to some GCM climate change experiments highlights the difference between model types and experiments (e.g., equilibrium or transient). The latest generation of climate change experiments has been performed using fully coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMS. These allow transient simulations of climate change to be performed with respect to a given greenhouse gas forcing scenario. There are, however,more » a number of problems with these simulations which pose difficulties for the construction of climate change scenarios for use in climate change impacts assessment. The characteristics of the transient climate change experiments which pose difficulties for the construction of climate change scenarios are discussed. Three examples of these problems are: different climate change experiments use different greenhouse gas concentration scenarios; the `cold-start` problem makes it difficult to link future projections of climate change to a given calendar year; a drift of the climate is noticeable in the control simulations. In order to construct climate change scenarios for impacts assessment a method has therefore to be employed which addresses these problems. At present the climate modeling and climate change impacts communities are somewhat polarized in their approach to spatial scales. Current GCMs model the climate at resolutions larger than 2.5 {times} 3.75{degree}, while the majority of impacts assessment studies are undertaken at scales below 50km (or 0.5{degree}). This paper concludes by addressing the problems in bringing together these two different modeling perspectives by presenting a number of regional climate change scenarios. 35 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.« less