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Title: Nitrogen and water management on irrigated alluvial soils to protect ground water quality

Abstract

Ground water in much of the Platte River Valley of Central Nebraska is contaminated by nitrate above the drinking water standards. Research has shown that much of the nitrate in ground water is due to excess N fertilizer and irrigation water applied to continuous corn monocultures. Nebraska's Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA) project was established in 1990 as part of the President's Water Quality Initiative to develop and demonstrate how state-of-the-art N and water management practices can improve ground water quality while maintaining crop yields. Shallow ground water used for irrigation contains about 30 mg/L nitrate-N, which can be a valuable source of N for crops. Traditional furrow irrigation practices received two to three times as much irrigation water as either surge-flow furrow techniques or center pivot sprinkler irrigation systems. Water moving through the silt loam soil in the field under conventional furrow irrigation resulted in nitrate-N concentrations leaving the root zone averaging about 90 mg/L for the first two applications of water with a total N loss of about 88 kg/ha. Improved water application methods that distribute water more uniformly than conventional furrow irrigation allow fertilizer applications through the irrigation water (fertigation) to correct a crop N deficiency. Chlorophyllmore » meters were used to monitor crop N status and schedule fertigation as needed. Spoon-feeding the crop resulted in a 50 to 70% savings in fertilizer N application rates compared to conventional methods of corn production.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];
  1. Dept. of Agriculture, Lincoln, NE (United States)
  2. Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7282802
Report Number(s):
CONF-9303210-
Journal ID: ISSN 0016-7592; CODEN: GAAPBC
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 25:3; Conference: 27. annual Geological Society of America (GSA) North-Central Section meeting, Rolla, MO (United States), 29-30 Mar 1993; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-7592
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; GROUND WATER; CONTAMINATION; WATER QUALITY; NEBRASKA; ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS; NITRATES; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; FERTILIZERS; IRRIGATION; WATER POLLUTION; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MASS TRANSFER; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; USA; WATER; 540220* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 540250 - Environment, Terrestrial- Site Resource & Use Studies- (1990-); 580000 - Geosciences

Citation Formats

Schepers, J S, Watts, D G, Spalding, R F, and Peterson, T A. Nitrogen and water management on irrigated alluvial soils to protect ground water quality. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Schepers, J S, Watts, D G, Spalding, R F, & Peterson, T A. Nitrogen and water management on irrigated alluvial soils to protect ground water quality. United States.
Schepers, J S, Watts, D G, Spalding, R F, and Peterson, T A. Mon . "Nitrogen and water management on irrigated alluvial soils to protect ground water quality". United States.
@article{osti_7282802,
title = {Nitrogen and water management on irrigated alluvial soils to protect ground water quality},
author = {Schepers, J S and Watts, D G and Spalding, R F and Peterson, T A},
abstractNote = {Ground water in much of the Platte River Valley of Central Nebraska is contaminated by nitrate above the drinking water standards. Research has shown that much of the nitrate in ground water is due to excess N fertilizer and irrigation water applied to continuous corn monocultures. Nebraska's Management Systems Evaluation Area (MSEA) project was established in 1990 as part of the President's Water Quality Initiative to develop and demonstrate how state-of-the-art N and water management practices can improve ground water quality while maintaining crop yields. Shallow ground water used for irrigation contains about 30 mg/L nitrate-N, which can be a valuable source of N for crops. Traditional furrow irrigation practices received two to three times as much irrigation water as either surge-flow furrow techniques or center pivot sprinkler irrigation systems. Water moving through the silt loam soil in the field under conventional furrow irrigation resulted in nitrate-N concentrations leaving the root zone averaging about 90 mg/L for the first two applications of water with a total N loss of about 88 kg/ha. Improved water application methods that distribute water more uniformly than conventional furrow irrigation allow fertilizer applications through the irrigation water (fertigation) to correct a crop N deficiency. Chlorophyll meters were used to monitor crop N status and schedule fertigation as needed. Spoon-feeding the crop resulted in a 50 to 70% savings in fertilizer N application rates compared to conventional methods of corn production.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geological Society of America, Abstracts with Programs; (United States)},
issn = {0016-7592},
number = ,
volume = 25:3,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {3}
}

Conference:
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