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Title: Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)]

Abstract

An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7281334
Report Number(s):
SAND-91-2303C; CONF-9206212-1
ON: DE92017053
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-76DP00789
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 48. annual meeting of the Institute of Navigation conference, Washington, DC (United States), 29 Jun - 1 Jul 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; SYNTHETIC-APERTURE RADAR; DESIGN; AIRCRAFT; ANTENNAS; FLIGHT TESTING; MAPPING; MOTION; NAVIGATION; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RADAR; RANGE FINDERS; TESTING; 420200* - Engineering- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Fellerhoff, J.R., and Kohler, S.M. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)]. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Fellerhoff, J.R., & Kohler, S.M. Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)]. United States.
Fellerhoff, J.R., and Kohler, S.M. Tue . "Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)]". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7281334.
@article{osti_7281334,
title = {Development of a GPS-aided motion measurement, pointing, and stabilization system for a Synthetic Aperture Radar. [Global Positioning System (GPS)]},
author = {Fellerhoff, J.R. and Kohler, S.M.},
abstractNote = {An advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Motion Compensation System has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The system includes a miniaturized high accuracy ring laser gyro inertial measurement unit, a three axis gimbal pointing and stabilization assembly, a differential Global Positioning System (GPS) navigation aiding system, and a pilot guidance system. The system provides several improvements over previous SNL motion compensation systems and is capable of antenna stabilization to less than 0.01 degrees RMS and absolute position measurement to less than 5.0 meters RMS. These accuracies have been demonstrated in recent flight testing aboard a DHC-6-300 Twin Otter'' aircraft.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}

Conference:
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