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Title: Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer and radiation. Progress report X, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976

Abstract

The accumulated analysis of tissues shows statistically significant discriminations between normal and neoplastic tissues of a variety of types. The practical identification of cancer by chemical means is thus possible, in principle. The principle itself is of immediate importance: that cancers share a common chemical pattern that can be sought in diagnostic studies, and targeted for therapeutic manipulations. To pursue these studies, additional varieties of transplantable neoplasms were produced and described. The common composition shared by neoplasms bears many resemblances to that of normal immature tissues, and this has reinforced interest in the programmed gene expressions we have studied during development. The development of physiological functions in parallel with the appearance of enzyme components in differentiating tissues has also been a fertile field. Instances of gene mutation associated with absence of an enzyme and consequently with severe functional impairment have been simpler to analyze. A study of phenylketonuria was begun, this time focussing our knowledge of the regulation of gene expression to produce an experimental model of the diesease. A new mutation in the rat causing infantile ichthyosis was identified and isolated. One sign of the disease is hyperkeratosis, analogous to that seen in preneoplastic lesions. The susceptibility of thesemore » animals to carcinogenesis in the skin is being studied. The quantitative analysis of numerous enzymes in various tissues has disclosed a variety of new isozymes which have been studied sufficiently to define them as chemically new species and to survey their possible functional importance. The include the several glutaminases, glutamine synthetase and its associated transferase isozyme (glutamine hydroxylamine transferase), and the new arginase of non-hepatic tissues. car« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New England Deaconess Hospital, Boston, Mass. (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7265351
Report Number(s):
COO-3085-51
TRN: 08-019610
DOE Contract Number:  
E(11-1)-3085
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ARGINASE; METABOLISM; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CARCINOGENESIS; ENZYMES; LIGASES; MUTATIONS; NEOPLASMS; TRANSPLANTS; SKIN DISEASES; TISSUES; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; TRANSFERASES; GENES; RATS; SKIN; ANIMALS; BODY; DISEASES; HYDROLASES; MAMMALS; ORGANS; PATHOGENESIS; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES; 550500* - Metabolism; 550200 - Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Knox, W. E.. Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer and radiation. Progress report X, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976. United States: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.2172/7265351.
Knox, W. E.. Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer and radiation. Progress report X, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/7265351
Knox, W. E.. 1976. "Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer and radiation. Progress report X, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/7265351. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/7265351.
@article{osti_7265351,
title = {Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer and radiation. Progress report X, 1 May 1975--30 April 1976},
author = {Knox, W. E.},
abstractNote = {The accumulated analysis of tissues shows statistically significant discriminations between normal and neoplastic tissues of a variety of types. The practical identification of cancer by chemical means is thus possible, in principle. The principle itself is of immediate importance: that cancers share a common chemical pattern that can be sought in diagnostic studies, and targeted for therapeutic manipulations. To pursue these studies, additional varieties of transplantable neoplasms were produced and described. The common composition shared by neoplasms bears many resemblances to that of normal immature tissues, and this has reinforced interest in the programmed gene expressions we have studied during development. The development of physiological functions in parallel with the appearance of enzyme components in differentiating tissues has also been a fertile field. Instances of gene mutation associated with absence of an enzyme and consequently with severe functional impairment have been simpler to analyze. A study of phenylketonuria was begun, this time focussing our knowledge of the regulation of gene expression to produce an experimental model of the diesease. A new mutation in the rat causing infantile ichthyosis was identified and isolated. One sign of the disease is hyperkeratosis, analogous to that seen in preneoplastic lesions. The susceptibility of these animals to carcinogenesis in the skin is being studied. The quantitative analysis of numerous enzymes in various tissues has disclosed a variety of new isozymes which have been studied sufficiently to define them as chemically new species and to survey their possible functional importance. The include the several glutaminases, glutamine synthetase and its associated transferase isozyme (glutamine hydroxylamine transferase), and the new arginase of non-hepatic tissues. car},
doi = {10.2172/7265351},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7265351}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1976},
month = {6}
}