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Title: Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers

Abstract

This paper discusses the impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments related to acid rain controls, as they apply to industrial boilers. Emphasis is placed on explaining the Title IV provisions of the Amendments that permit nonutility sources to participate in the SO{sub 2} allowance system. The allowance system, as it pertains to industrial boiler operators, is described, and the opportunities for operators to trade and/or sell SO{sub 2} emission credits is discussed. The paper also reviews flue gas desulfurization system technologies available for industrial boiler operators who may choose to participate in the system. Furnace sorbent injection, advanced silicate process, lime spray drying, dry sorbent injection, and limestone scrubbing are described, including statements of their SO{sub 2} removing capability, commercial status, and costs. Capital costs, levelized costs and cost-effectiveness are presented for these technologies.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Radian Corp., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7264010
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Progress; (United States); Journal Volume: 10:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; FLUE GAS; DESULFURIZATION; SULFUR DIOXIDE; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; US CLEAN AIR ACT; COMPLIANCE; ACID RAIN; BOILERS; COST; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONTROL; GASEOUS WASTES; LAWS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION CONTROL; POLLUTION LAWS; RAIN; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; WASTES; 540120* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 290300 - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety; 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects; 010800 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Waste Management

Citation Formats

Maibodi, M. Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1002/ep.670100418.
Maibodi, M. Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers. United States. doi:10.1002/ep.670100418.
Maibodi, M. Fri . "Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers". United States. doi:10.1002/ep.670100418.
@article{osti_7264010,
title = {Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers},
author = {Maibodi, M.},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses the impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments related to acid rain controls, as they apply to industrial boilers. Emphasis is placed on explaining the Title IV provisions of the Amendments that permit nonutility sources to participate in the SO{sub 2} allowance system. The allowance system, as it pertains to industrial boiler operators, is described, and the opportunities for operators to trade and/or sell SO{sub 2} emission credits is discussed. The paper also reviews flue gas desulfurization system technologies available for industrial boiler operators who may choose to participate in the system. Furnace sorbent injection, advanced silicate process, lime spray drying, dry sorbent injection, and limestone scrubbing are described, including statements of their SO{sub 2} removing capability, commercial status, and costs. Capital costs, levelized costs and cost-effectiveness are presented for these technologies.},
doi = {10.1002/ep.670100418},
journal = {Environmental Progress; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 10:4,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1991},
month = {Fri Nov 01 00:00:00 EST 1991}
}
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