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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California

Abstract

An evaluation of environmental conditions and possible health effects among workers exposed to coke dust was conducted. Personal breathing-zone (PBZ) concentrations of total airborne dust ranged from 0.1 to 12 milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m3) with a median of 1.6 mg/m3; mass median particle diameter was about 8 micrometers. Very high PBZ concentrations of coke dust occurred during a semimonthly cleanup of underground coke pits; levels ranged from 98 to 190mg/m3 with a mean of 140mg/m3. Oil mists were not detected. Exposures to polynuclear aromatic compounds were below the analytical limit of detection among workers for routine jobs. Abnormal pulmonary function tests were found in 12% of those tested. Five cases of chronic bronchitis and seven of chronic cough, 10 and 13% respectively, were identified among those interviewed. The authors conclude that there were potentially hazardous exposures to high dust levels during semimonthly coke-pit cleaning jobs.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7248535
Report Number(s):
PB-86-237229/XAB; HETA-82-341-1682
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COKING PLANTS; AIR POLLUTION; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; COKE; DUSTS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INHALATION; INSPECTION; TOXICITY; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; INTAKE; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; POLLUTION; SAFETY 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 552000 -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Lee, S.A., Lipscomb, J.A., and Neumeister, C.E.. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Lee, S.A., Lipscomb, J.A., & Neumeister, C.E.. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California. United States.
Lee, S.A., Lipscomb, J.A., and Neumeister, C.E.. 1986. "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7248535,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 82-341-1682, Great Lakes Carbon, Wilmington, California},
author = {Lee, S.A. and Lipscomb, J.A. and Neumeister, C.E.},
abstractNote = {An evaluation of environmental conditions and possible health effects among workers exposed to coke dust was conducted. Personal breathing-zone (PBZ) concentrations of total airborne dust ranged from 0.1 to 12 milligrams/cubic meter (mg/m3) with a median of 1.6 mg/m3; mass median particle diameter was about 8 micrometers. Very high PBZ concentrations of coke dust occurred during a semimonthly cleanup of underground coke pits; levels ranged from 98 to 190mg/m3 with a mean of 140mg/m3. Oil mists were not detected. Exposures to polynuclear aromatic compounds were below the analytical limit of detection among workers for routine jobs. Abnormal pulmonary function tests were found in 12% of those tested. Five cases of chronic bronchitis and seven of chronic cough, 10 and 13% respectively, were identified among those interviewed. The authors conclude that there were potentially hazardous exposures to high dust levels during semimonthly coke-pit cleaning jobs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 4
}

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