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Title: Cladosporium sp. , a potential fungus for bioremediation of wood-treating wastes

Abstract

A fungus, Cladosporium sp., was isolated from a very old wood-treating plant sludge pond in Weed, California. A preliminary study showed no inhibition of mycelial growth at 5,500 {mu}g polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) per ml of potato dextrose agar (PDA). Pentachlorophenol (PCP) inhibited mycelial growth at 10 {mu}g/ml of PDA. Rates of breakdown of both PAHs and PCP in the soil and water system were studied using this fungus. The results of this study and the application of this fungus for cleaning up contaminated sites will be discussed.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Mississippi Forest Products Utilization Lab., Mississippi State (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7245008
Report Number(s):
CONF-890490--
Journal ID: ISSN 0093-3066; CODEN: ACEPC
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: American Chemical Society, Division of Environmental Chemistry, Preprints; (USA); Journal Volume: 29:1; Conference: American Chemical Society Division of Environmental Chemistry meeting, Dallas, TX (USA), 9-14 Apr 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; WOOD WASTES; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; DATA ANALYSIS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MEASURING METHODS; PHENOLS; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; AROMATICS; DATA; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RECOVERY; SOLID WASTES; WASTES 540210* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Basic Studies-- (1990-); 560000 -- Biomedical Sciences, Applied Studies; 540310 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Basic Studies-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Borazjani, H., Ferguson, B., Hendrix, F., McFarland, L., McGinnis, G., Pope, D., Strobel, D., and Wagner, J. Cladosporium sp. , a potential fungus for bioremediation of wood-treating wastes. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Borazjani, H., Ferguson, B., Hendrix, F., McFarland, L., McGinnis, G., Pope, D., Strobel, D., & Wagner, J. Cladosporium sp. , a potential fungus for bioremediation of wood-treating wastes. United States.
Borazjani, H., Ferguson, B., Hendrix, F., McFarland, L., McGinnis, G., Pope, D., Strobel, D., and Wagner, J. 1989. "Cladosporium sp. , a potential fungus for bioremediation of wood-treating wastes". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7245008,
title = {Cladosporium sp. , a potential fungus for bioremediation of wood-treating wastes},
author = {Borazjani, H. and Ferguson, B. and Hendrix, F. and McFarland, L. and McGinnis, G. and Pope, D. and Strobel, D. and Wagner, J.},
abstractNote = {A fungus, Cladosporium sp., was isolated from a very old wood-treating plant sludge pond in Weed, California. A preliminary study showed no inhibition of mycelial growth at 5,500 {mu}g polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) per ml of potato dextrose agar (PDA). Pentachlorophenol (PCP) inhibited mycelial growth at 10 {mu}g/ml of PDA. Rates of breakdown of both PAHs and PCP in the soil and water system were studied using this fungus. The results of this study and the application of this fungus for cleaning up contaminated sites will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {American Chemical Society, Division of Environmental Chemistry, Preprints; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 29:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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