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Title: Feasibility of methanol/gasoline blends for automotive use

Abstract

The results of the octane evaluation program support current opinion and data for Research Octane ratings; methanol can produce a significant increase in the Research Octane Number of unleaded gasoline, particularly if the base fuel RON is less than 90. Generally, the higher the RON of the base fuel, the lower the antiknock improvement achieved by adding methanol. The Motor Ratings showed significantly smaller octane increases than those found for the Research method. Even those base fuels with a relatively low MON did not show really significant increases in MON when blended with methanol. Base fuel with a MON greater than 83 gave virtually no change in MON when blended with methanol. The octane behavior of the blend casts serious doubt on the use of methanol to improve the Motor Octane Number of unleaded gasolines. However, these data also indicate that methanol is not likely to degrade the MON rating of an unleaded gasoline to which it is added. If the reason for adding methanol to gasoline is to increase the volume of liquid fuel, this information implies that the MON rating of the blend will not be reduced. The key words to the future of methanol/gasoline blends for automotivemore » use are need and availability. Technically, the operation of methanol/gasoline blends in automotive engines is feasible with some associated problems. Economically, methanol is not yet competitive with gasoline produced from petroleum, hence the need has not been strongly established. Since the need, or market, is not established, the capital expenses involved in producing methanol from coal or garbage are not presently justified. However, if 40 to 50 percent of the crude oil used in the United States to produce petroleum products should suddenly become unavailable, the need would be very real. The necessity of complete evaluation of methanol and other alternate fuels is evident.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Missouri, Rolla
OSTI Identifier:
7215703
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Prepr., Div. Pet. Chem., Am. Chem. Soc.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 22:1; Conference: American Chemical Society meeting, San Francisco, CA, USA, 29 Aug 1976; Other Information: See CONF-760897--P2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 02 PETROLEUM; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; AUTOMOTIVE FUELS; COMBUSTION PROPERTIES; GASOLINE; METHANOL; ANTIKNOCK RATINGS; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; MIXTURES; PERFORMANCE; ALCOHOLS; DISPERSIONS; FUELS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; 090210* - Alcohol Fuels- Properties- (1976-1989); 025000 - Petroleum- Combustion; 330800 - Emission Control- Alternative Fuels

Citation Formats

Johnson, R T, and Riley, R K. Feasibility of methanol/gasoline blends for automotive use. United States: N. p., 1977. Web.
Johnson, R T, & Riley, R K. Feasibility of methanol/gasoline blends for automotive use. United States.
Johnson, R T, and Riley, R K. Tue . "Feasibility of methanol/gasoline blends for automotive use". United States.
@article{osti_7215703,
title = {Feasibility of methanol/gasoline blends for automotive use},
author = {Johnson, R T and Riley, R K},
abstractNote = {The results of the octane evaluation program support current opinion and data for Research Octane ratings; methanol can produce a significant increase in the Research Octane Number of unleaded gasoline, particularly if the base fuel RON is less than 90. Generally, the higher the RON of the base fuel, the lower the antiknock improvement achieved by adding methanol. The Motor Ratings showed significantly smaller octane increases than those found for the Research method. Even those base fuels with a relatively low MON did not show really significant increases in MON when blended with methanol. Base fuel with a MON greater than 83 gave virtually no change in MON when blended with methanol. The octane behavior of the blend casts serious doubt on the use of methanol to improve the Motor Octane Number of unleaded gasolines. However, these data also indicate that methanol is not likely to degrade the MON rating of an unleaded gasoline to which it is added. If the reason for adding methanol to gasoline is to increase the volume of liquid fuel, this information implies that the MON rating of the blend will not be reduced. The key words to the future of methanol/gasoline blends for automotive use are need and availability. Technically, the operation of methanol/gasoline blends in automotive engines is feasible with some associated problems. Economically, methanol is not yet competitive with gasoline produced from petroleum, hence the need has not been strongly established. Since the need, or market, is not established, the capital expenses involved in producing methanol from coal or garbage are not presently justified. However, if 40 to 50 percent of the crude oil used in the United States to produce petroleum products should suddenly become unavailable, the need would be very real. The necessity of complete evaluation of methanol and other alternate fuels is evident.},
doi = {},
journal = {Prepr., Div. Pet. Chem., Am. Chem. Soc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 22:1,
place = {United States},
year = {1977},
month = {2}
}

Conference:
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