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Title: Experimental studies on the rheology of hard-sphere suspensions near the glass transition

Abstract

We have investigated the rheological behavior of sterically stabilized colloidal silica particles of three different sizes at volume fractions above 0.5. Despite a small surface charge, which elevated the intrinsic viscosity from the Einstein value of 2.5, the particles were found to behave essentially as hard spheres in the concentrated suspensions and to have properties highly reminiscent of molecular glasses. The zero shear rate viscosity, characteristic of disordered suspensions and present at all volume fractions, diverges as {phi} {yields} 0.6 and is well-described by the Doolittle equation for glassy flow. For suspensions with a relative zero shear rate viscosity greater than 5 {times} 10{sub 2}, shear thickening was observed. Characteristic time scales for particle rearrangement determined from critical shear rates for shear thinning and shear thickening were found to follow trends predicted for molecular glasses. A transition from a liquid like linear relaxation response to glassy stretched exponential behavior was observed as volume fraction was increased. The onset of the glassy relaxation response, indicative of nondecaying correlations, occurred near a volume fraction of 0.52.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7201766
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76ER01198
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry; (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 94:3; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3654
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; COLLOIDS; HARD-SPHERE MODEL; SILICA; RHEOLOGY; CALCULATION METHODS; DATA ANALYSIS; GLASS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MEASURING METHODS; PARTICLES; VISCOSITY; CHALCOGENIDES; DISPERSIONS; MINERALS; OXIDE MINERALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SILICON COMPOUNDS; SILICON OXIDES; 400200* - Inorganic, Organic, & Physical Chemistry; 360603 - Materials- Properties

Citation Formats

Marshall, L, and Zukoski, IV, C F. Experimental studies on the rheology of hard-sphere suspensions near the glass transition. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1021/j100366a030.
Marshall, L, & Zukoski, IV, C F. Experimental studies on the rheology of hard-sphere suspensions near the glass transition. United States. doi:10.1021/j100366a030.
Marshall, L, and Zukoski, IV, C F. Thu . "Experimental studies on the rheology of hard-sphere suspensions near the glass transition". United States. doi:10.1021/j100366a030.
@article{osti_7201766,
title = {Experimental studies on the rheology of hard-sphere suspensions near the glass transition},
author = {Marshall, L and Zukoski, IV, C F},
abstractNote = {We have investigated the rheological behavior of sterically stabilized colloidal silica particles of three different sizes at volume fractions above 0.5. Despite a small surface charge, which elevated the intrinsic viscosity from the Einstein value of 2.5, the particles were found to behave essentially as hard spheres in the concentrated suspensions and to have properties highly reminiscent of molecular glasses. The zero shear rate viscosity, characteristic of disordered suspensions and present at all volume fractions, diverges as {phi} {yields} 0.6 and is well-described by the Doolittle equation for glassy flow. For suspensions with a relative zero shear rate viscosity greater than 5 {times} 10{sub 2}, shear thickening was observed. Characteristic time scales for particle rearrangement determined from critical shear rates for shear thinning and shear thickening were found to follow trends predicted for molecular glasses. A transition from a liquid like linear relaxation response to glassy stretched exponential behavior was observed as volume fraction was increased. The onset of the glassy relaxation response, indicative of nondecaying correlations, occurred near a volume fraction of 0.52.},
doi = {10.1021/j100366a030},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry; (USA)},
issn = {0022-3654},
number = ,
volume = 94:3,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {2}
}