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Title: Picosecond switching measurements of a Josephson tunnel junction

Abstract

These experiments make use of both pico- and subpicosecond lasers in conjunction with photoconductive switches to create current pulses with fast rise time, adjustable amplitude, and in some cases, adjustable width. Pulses which are then used as excitations for Josephson tunnel junctions. To measure the time-domain response of these devices directly, a cryogenic electro-optic sampler was implemented with an unprecedented time resolution. An electrical transient propagated on a transmission line, with a rise time of 360 fs - a record - was measured. A new detection scheme was implemented that allowed measurements approaching the shot-noise limit. For the first time, measurements were made on a single junction which cannot be explained using a simple quasi-static model, i.e., a summation of bias and applied pulse current did not yield the critical value. In addition, these results were successfully modeled using the RCSJ model. Finally, chaos was observed in the I-V characteristics of these devices due to the periodic kicks that these current pulses represent. This is the first observation of chaos in a periodically kicked junction. Results led to the author to develop the concept of a critical pulse charge, rather than a critical current, as the measure of the junctionmore » switching threshold.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rochester Univ., NY (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7199920
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (Ph. D.)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 42 ENGINEERING; JOSEPHSON JUNCTIONS; Q-SWITCHING; MEASURING METHODS; LASERS; PULSE CIRCUITS; TIME RESOLUTION; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; JUNCTIONS; RESOLUTION; SUPERCONDUCTING JUNCTIONS; TIMING PROPERTIES; 420201* - Engineering- Cryogenic Equipment & Devices; 420800 - Engineering- Electronic Circuits & Devices- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Dykaar, D R. Picosecond switching measurements of a Josephson tunnel junction. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Dykaar, D R. Picosecond switching measurements of a Josephson tunnel junction. United States.
Dykaar, D R. 1987. "Picosecond switching measurements of a Josephson tunnel junction". United States.
@article{osti_7199920,
title = {Picosecond switching measurements of a Josephson tunnel junction},
author = {Dykaar, D R},
abstractNote = {These experiments make use of both pico- and subpicosecond lasers in conjunction with photoconductive switches to create current pulses with fast rise time, adjustable amplitude, and in some cases, adjustable width. Pulses which are then used as excitations for Josephson tunnel junctions. To measure the time-domain response of these devices directly, a cryogenic electro-optic sampler was implemented with an unprecedented time resolution. An electrical transient propagated on a transmission line, with a rise time of 360 fs - a record - was measured. A new detection scheme was implemented that allowed measurements approaching the shot-noise limit. For the first time, measurements were made on a single junction which cannot be explained using a simple quasi-static model, i.e., a summation of bias and applied pulse current did not yield the critical value. In addition, these results were successfully modeled using the RCSJ model. Finally, chaos was observed in the I-V characteristics of these devices due to the periodic kicks that these current pulses represent. This is the first observation of chaos in a periodically kicked junction. Results led to the author to develop the concept of a critical pulse charge, rather than a critical current, as the measure of the junction switching threshold.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/7199920}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {1}
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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