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Title: Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

Abstract

Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7189610
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Veterinary and Human Toxicology; (USA); Journal Volume: 32:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CATECHOLAMINES; RADIOIMMUNOASSAY; LEAD; TOXICITY; CHILDREN; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; AGE GROUPS; AMINES; AROMATICS; BIOASSAY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; ELEMENTS; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; IMMUNOASSAY; IMMUNOLOGY; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; METALS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHENOLS; POLYPHENOLS; RADIOASSAY; RADIOIMMUNODETECTION; RADIOIMMUNOLOGY; TRACER TECHNIQUES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology; 550501 - Metabolism- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

deCastro, F.J. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
deCastro, F.J. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning. United States.
deCastro, F.J. 1990. "Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7189610,
title = {Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning},
author = {deCastro, F.J.},
abstractNote = {Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.},
doi = {},
journal = {Veterinary and Human Toxicology; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 32:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 4
}
  • Whether neuropsychological impairment occurs in children with increased lead absorption who are without clinical symptoms is of current concern. This issue, which involves potentially large numbers of children, remains unresolved, in part because of the lack of sensitive biochemical indicators of the effects of lead on the nervous system. In experimental subclinical lead poisoning in mice, significant increases in homovanillic acid and vanillylmandelic acid have been found in brain and urine. In children with increased lead absorption, these acids were measured in urine collected quantitatively under controlled dietary conditions; preliminary results show fivefold increases in the daily output of thesemore » compounds. These data suggest that the altered catecholamine metabolism also occurs in children.« less
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  • EDTA (calcium disodium edetate) lead mobilization and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) finger bone lead tests were done in 42 patients with chronic renal failure and without persisting lead intoxication. Nineteen of 23 patients with gout and 8 of 19 without gout had positive EDTA lead mobilization tests. Those patients with gout excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than those without gout. In the gout group 17 patients denied any childhood or industrial exposure to lead. They had a greater number of positive tests and excreted significantly more excess lead chelate than 14 patients with neither gout nor lead exposure. These resultsmore » confirm that gout in the presence of chronic renal failure is a useful marker of chronic lead poisoning. Of 27 patients with positive lead mobilization tests, only 13 had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (sensitivity 48%). Three of 15 patients with negative lead mobilization tests had elevated XRF finger bone lead concentrations (specificity 80%). Although the XRF finger bone lead test is a convenient noninvasive addition to the diagnostic evaluation of patients with chronic renal failure and gout, its application is limited due to the lack of sensitivity of the method.« less
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