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Title: Luminescence probe study of the conditions affecting colloidal semiconductor growth in reverse micelles and water-in-oil microemulsions

Abstract

A series or reverse AOT micelles and w/o microemulsions have been studied by analyzing the luminescence decay of ruthenium tri(2,2{prime}-bipyridine) in the presence of quencher. The analysis was based both on the established model for luminescence decay in micelles and on the recently developed fractal model of microemulsions. Colloidal cadmium sulfide has then been produced in the microemulsions and the conditions for the particle size growth and size polydispersity have been related with the data of the luminescence decay analysis.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Patras (Greece))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7171277
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry; (USA); Journal Volume: 93:15
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; MICELLAR SYSTEMS; LUMINESCENCE; MICROEMULSIONS; COLLOIDS; DATA ANALYSIS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MEASURING METHODS; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; DATA; DISPERSIONS; EMULSIONS; INFORMATION; MATERIALS; NUMERICAL DATA; 400000* - Chemistry; 360600 - Other Materials; 360602 - Other Materials- Structure & Phase Studies

Citation Formats

Modes, S., and Lianos, P. Luminescence probe study of the conditions affecting colloidal semiconductor growth in reverse micelles and water-in-oil microemulsions. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1021/j100352a040.
Modes, S., & Lianos, P. Luminescence probe study of the conditions affecting colloidal semiconductor growth in reverse micelles and water-in-oil microemulsions. United States. doi:10.1021/j100352a040.
Modes, S., and Lianos, P. 1989. "Luminescence probe study of the conditions affecting colloidal semiconductor growth in reverse micelles and water-in-oil microemulsions". United States. doi:10.1021/j100352a040.
@article{osti_7171277,
title = {Luminescence probe study of the conditions affecting colloidal semiconductor growth in reverse micelles and water-in-oil microemulsions},
author = {Modes, S. and Lianos, P.},
abstractNote = {A series or reverse AOT micelles and w/o microemulsions have been studied by analyzing the luminescence decay of ruthenium tri(2,2{prime}-bipyridine) in the presence of quencher. The analysis was based both on the established model for luminescence decay in micelles and on the recently developed fractal model of microemulsions. Colloidal cadmium sulfide has then been produced in the microemulsions and the conditions for the particle size growth and size polydispersity have been related with the data of the luminescence decay analysis.},
doi = {10.1021/j100352a040},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 93:15,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 7
}
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