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Title: Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993

Abstract

This report provides a detailed evaluation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a potential technology improvement over the Coast Guard's existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RD Center), Environmental Safety Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the U.S. Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the RD Center on a PC-based computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Synthetic aperture radar, Side looking airborne radar, Oil slicks.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Coast Guard, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
7170571
Report Number(s):
AD-A-278796/8/XAB; USCG-D--02-94
CNN: MIPR-Z51100-2-E00467
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; OIL SPILLS; REMOTE SENSING; SYNTHETIC-APERTURE RADAR; EVALUATION; PROGRESS REPORT; DOCUMENT TYPES; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RADAR; RANGE FINDERS 022000* -- Petroleum-- Transport, Handling, & Storage; 020900 -- Petroleum-- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Hover, G.L., Mastin, G.A., Axline, R.M., and Bradley, J.D. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Hover, G.L., Mastin, G.A., Axline, R.M., & Bradley, J.D. Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993. United States.
Hover, G.L., Mastin, G.A., Axline, R.M., and Bradley, J.D. 1993. "Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7170571,
title = {Evaluation of synthetic aperture radar for oil-spill response. Final report, June 1992-September 1993},
author = {Hover, G.L. and Mastin, G.A. and Axline, R.M. and Bradley, J.D.},
abstractNote = {This report provides a detailed evaluation of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) as a potential technology improvement over the Coast Guard's existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center (RD Center), Environmental Safety Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the U.S. Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the RD Center on a PC-based computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Synthetic aperture radar, Side looking airborne radar, Oil slicks.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month =
}

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