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Title: Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines

Abstract

An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center
OSTI Identifier:
7167106
Report Number(s):
N-92-32863; NASA-TM--104531; E--6407; NAS--1.15:104531
CNN: RTOP 505-63-5A
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; LUBRICATING OILS; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; TURBOJET ENGINES; LUBRICATION; AIRCRAFT; CORROSION RESISTANCE; HYDROCARBONS; MATERIALS TESTING; MINERAL OILS; OXIDATION; SILICONES; STABILITY; SYNTHETIC LUBRICANTS; THERMAL DEGRADATION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ENGINES; EQUIPMENT; LUBRICANTS; MACHINERY; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC SILICON COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; POLYMERS; SILOXANES; TESTING; TURBOMACHINERY 330000* -- Advanced Propulsion Systems; 360606 -- Other Materials-- Physical Properties-- (1992-); 360604 -- Materials-- Corrosion, Erosion, & Degradation

Citation Formats

Loomis, W.R., and Fusaro, R.L. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Loomis, W.R., & Fusaro, R.L. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines. United States.
Loomis, W.R., and Fusaro, R.L. 1992. "Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7167106,
title = {Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines},
author = {Loomis, W.R. and Fusaro, R.L.},
abstractNote = {An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:
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