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Title: Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-092-1967, Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa

Abstract

A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa. About 140 production workers were employed in manufacturing hydraulic pumps. The major exposures investigated were to nine different types of cutting fluids with their biocides, the solvent-based floor cleaner Marvella, mineral spirits, two hand cleaners, oils used for the lubrication of machines, and metal chippings. Most machines were supplied with coolant from a central system. There was no mechanism in place to clean the coolant and no regular monitoring was conducted for coolant concentration, pH, or bacterial or fungal counts. Workers had experienced an outbreak of dermatitis in September 1986 at which time the coolant in most machines had become dense, brown, and had a foul odor. Sampling revealed the coolant to be ten times more concentrated than it should have been and contaminated with lubricating oils. Medical histories, patch tests, and questionnaires were used to obtain data from the workers. The report concludes that workers exposed to Lubrisyn-plus with its biocide Ducide-20, or Trim-sol, or to Marvella had a significantly higher risk of developing dermatitis. Specific measures for fluid maintenance, employee education, hazard communication, and personal protection are recommended.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7166048
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7166048
Report Number(s):
PB-90-129107/XAB; HETA--87-092-1967
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COOLANTS; HEALTH HAZARDS; CUTTING FLUIDS; DERMATITIS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; LUBRICATING OILS; SOLVENTS; INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE; INSPECTION; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY; TOXIC MATERIALS; TOXICITY; DISEASES; FLUIDS; HAZARDS; LUBRICANTS; MATERIALS; MEDICINE; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM PRODUCTS; SAFETY; SKIN DISEASES 540120* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 552000 -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Gupta, S., Laubli, T., and Sinks, T. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-092-1967, Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Gupta, S., Laubli, T., & Sinks, T. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-092-1967, Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa. United States.
Gupta, S., Laubli, T., and Sinks, T. Sun . "Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-092-1967, Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7166048,
title = {Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-092-1967, Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa},
author = {Gupta, S. and Laubli, T. and Sinks, T.},
abstractNote = {A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Iowa Industrial Hydraulics, Pocahontas, Iowa. About 140 production workers were employed in manufacturing hydraulic pumps. The major exposures investigated were to nine different types of cutting fluids with their biocides, the solvent-based floor cleaner Marvella, mineral spirits, two hand cleaners, oils used for the lubrication of machines, and metal chippings. Most machines were supplied with coolant from a central system. There was no mechanism in place to clean the coolant and no regular monitoring was conducted for coolant concentration, pH, or bacterial or fungal counts. Workers had experienced an outbreak of dermatitis in September 1986 at which time the coolant in most machines had become dense, brown, and had a foul odor. Sampling revealed the coolant to be ten times more concentrated than it should have been and contaminated with lubricating oils. Medical histories, patch tests, and questionnaires were used to obtain data from the workers. The report concludes that workers exposed to Lubrisyn-plus with its biocide Ducide-20, or Trim-sol, or to Marvella had a significantly higher risk of developing dermatitis. Specific measures for fluid maintenance, employee education, hazard communication, and personal protection are recommended.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

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