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Title: Acid deposition and vehicle emissions: European environmental pressures on Britain

Abstract

This study, from the Joint Energy Programme and the Policy Studies Institute, examines the increasing political pressure being placed on Britain by members of the European community to take major steps toward improved environmental protection. Taking acid rain and vehicle emissions as typical examples of the conflict, the author examines Sweden, West Germany and France, as well as Britain, and unravels the criticisms, the arguments and the various approaches being taken to deal with environmental concerns. His conclusions point to widespread conflicts between differing national priorities and indicate that Britain may not be the only 'black sheep' in this continuing debate.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7166040
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; COMMON MARKET; TRANSFRONTIER POLLUTION; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ACID RAIN; AIR POLLUTION; BILATERAL AGREEMENTS; DEPOSITION; EMISSION; LONG-RANGE TRANSPORT; POLLUTANTS; POLLUTION REGULATIONS; TRANSFRONTIER CONTAMINATION; VEHICLES; AGREEMENTS; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CONTAMINATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; MASS TRANSFER; POLLUTION; RAIN; REGULATIONS 500200* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 500600 -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Regulations-- (-1989); 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety; 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology

Citation Formats

Brackley, P. Acid deposition and vehicle emissions: European environmental pressures on Britain. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Brackley, P. Acid deposition and vehicle emissions: European environmental pressures on Britain. United States.
Brackley, P. 1987. "Acid deposition and vehicle emissions: European environmental pressures on Britain". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7166040,
title = {Acid deposition and vehicle emissions: European environmental pressures on Britain},
author = {Brackley, P.},
abstractNote = {This study, from the Joint Energy Programme and the Policy Studies Institute, examines the increasing political pressure being placed on Britain by members of the European community to take major steps toward improved environmental protection. Taking acid rain and vehicle emissions as typical examples of the conflict, the author examines Sweden, West Germany and France, as well as Britain, and unravels the criticisms, the arguments and the various approaches being taken to deal with environmental concerns. His conclusions point to widespread conflicts between differing national priorities and indicate that Britain may not be the only 'black sheep' in this continuing debate.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 1
}

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