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Title: The development of Soviet rocket engines (For strategic missiles)

Abstract

A first-hand account of developments in the Soviet rocket industry is presented. The organization and leadership of the rocket and missile industry are traced from its beginning in the 1920s. The development of the Glushko Experimental Design Bureau, where the majority of Soviet rocket engines were created, is related. The evolution of Soviet rocket engines is traced in regard to both their technical improvement and their application in missiles and space vehicles. Improved Glushko engines and specialized Isaev and Kosberg engines are discussed. The difficulties faced by the Soviet missile and space program, such as the pre-Sputnik failures, the oscillation problem of 1965/1966, which exposed a weakness in Soviet ICBM missiles, and the Nedelin disaster of 1960, which cost the lives of more than 200 scientists and engineers, as well as the Commander-in-Chief of the Strategic Rocket Forces, Marshall Nedelin, are examined. 122 refs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7160514
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; MISSILES; ROCKET ENGINES; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; USSR; COOLANTS; DESIGN; FAILURES; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; LAUNCHING; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; ASIA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENGINES; EUROPE 450000* -- Military Technology, Weaponry, & National Defense

Citation Formats

Bolonkin, A. The development of Soviet rocket engines (For strategic missiles). United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Bolonkin, A. The development of Soviet rocket engines (For strategic missiles). United States.
Bolonkin, A. 1991. "The development of Soviet rocket engines (For strategic missiles)". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7160514,
title = {The development of Soviet rocket engines (For strategic missiles)},
author = {Bolonkin, A.},
abstractNote = {A first-hand account of developments in the Soviet rocket industry is presented. The organization and leadership of the rocket and missile industry are traced from its beginning in the 1920s. The development of the Glushko Experimental Design Bureau, where the majority of Soviet rocket engines were created, is related. The evolution of Soviet rocket engines is traced in regard to both their technical improvement and their application in missiles and space vehicles. Improved Glushko engines and specialized Isaev and Kosberg engines are discussed. The difficulties faced by the Soviet missile and space program, such as the pre-Sputnik failures, the oscillation problem of 1965/1966, which exposed a weakness in Soviet ICBM missiles, and the Nedelin disaster of 1960, which cost the lives of more than 200 scientists and engineers, as well as the Commander-in-Chief of the Strategic Rocket Forces, Marshall Nedelin, are examined. 122 refs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month = 1
}

Book:
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  • This book presents papers on ballistic missile defense. Topics considered include the historical aspects of US strategic concepts and programs, Soviet perspectives on the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI), national security, international cooperation, nuclear proliferation, arms control and SDI, the technical feasibility of the SDI, foreign policy, and US and Soviet views on prospects for a cooperative transition in strategic defense.
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  • A comprehensive conductive, convective and radiative model for thermal analysis of rocket thrust chambers and nozzles is presented. In this model, the rocket thrust chamber and nozzle are subdivided into a number of stations along the longitudinal direction. At each station a finite element scheme is used to evaluate wall temperature distribution. The hot-gas-side convective heat transport is evaluated by numerically solving the compressible boundary layer equations and the radiative fluxes are evaluated by implementing an exchange factor scheme. The convective heat flux in the cooling channel is modeled based on the existing closed form correlations for rocket cooling channels.more » The conductive, convective and radiative processes are conjugated through an iterative procedure. The hot-gas-side heat transfer coefficients evaluated based on this model are compared to the experimental results reported in the literature. The computed convective heat transfer coefficients agree very well with experimental data for most of the engine except the throat where a discrepancy of approximately 20% exists. The model is applied to a typical regeneratively cooled rocket engine and the resulting wall temperature and heat flux distribution are presented.« less
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  • The hearing was before the Subcommittee on Energy Production and Supply. The purpose of the amendment (Energy Action No. 12) is to accelerate the development schedule of the reserve so that there will be 500 million barrels of oil in storage by the end of 1980, instead of 1982. Statements were presented by Sen. Dewey F. Bartlett, Oklahoma; John G. Buckley, Northeast Petroleum Industries, Inc.; Dr. James S. Cross, American Petroleum Institute; Sen. John A. Durkin, New Hampshire; Sen. Floyd K. Haskell, Colorado; Kenneth S. Kamlet and Dr. Eric Rifkin, National Wildlife Federation; and Rear Admiral William Myers, :Department ofmore » Defense before John F. O'Leary's statement from the Federal Energy Administration was presented by Thomas E. Noel. The FEA statement described the proposed action and explained the actions necessary to attain that objective. FEA was also afforded the opportunity to discuss the feasibility of accomplishing the accelerated schedule and reviewed the benefits and costs from the speedier rate of storage. The economic and environmental impacts were also reviewed. The final statement was presented by Dr. James G. Tewksbury, Foster Associates, Inc. Answers to questions addressed to the FEA are published in Appendix I. (MCW)« less