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Title: Mitigating factors on air concentrations of radon emanating from different granite samples

Abstract

Continuous exposure to increased air concentrations of radon in living areas is to be avoided according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and several published reports. Radon concentrations in ambient air are influenced by several factors related to the nature of the radon source itself, environmental conditions, and the presence of mitigating factors, if any. In this study, crushed granite samples of different types, particle diameters, and moisture contents were compared in simplified test systems with regard to radon emanation from the samples. The effects of selected mitigating factors, namely, ventilation and different barriers to diffusion of emanated radon were determined.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7115004
Report Number(s):
CONF-911107--
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN: TANSA
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (United States); Journal Volume: 64; Conference: 1991 Winter meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) session on fundamentals of fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, San Francisco, CA (United States), 10-15 Nov 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; RADON; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; MITIGATION; AIR; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; DIFFUSION BARRIERS; EMANOMETERS; GRANITES; HUMIDITY; INHALATION; PARTICLE SIZE; QUANTITY RATIO; RADIATION MONITORING; US EPA; VENTILATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASES; IGNEOUS ROCKS; INTAKE; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MONITORING; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; NONMETALS; PLUTONIC ROCKS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RARE GASES; ROCKS; SIZE; US ORGANIZATIONS 540130* -- Environment, Atmospheric-- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-); 540230 -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Qari, T.M., Mamoon, A.M., and Abdul-Fattah, A.F. Mitigating factors on air concentrations of radon emanating from different granite samples. United States: N. p., 1991. Web.
Qari, T.M., Mamoon, A.M., & Abdul-Fattah, A.F. Mitigating factors on air concentrations of radon emanating from different granite samples. United States.
Qari, T.M., Mamoon, A.M., and Abdul-Fattah, A.F. 1991. "Mitigating factors on air concentrations of radon emanating from different granite samples". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7115004,
title = {Mitigating factors on air concentrations of radon emanating from different granite samples},
author = {Qari, T.M. and Mamoon, A.M. and Abdul-Fattah, A.F.},
abstractNote = {Continuous exposure to increased air concentrations of radon in living areas is to be avoided according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and several published reports. Radon concentrations in ambient air are influenced by several factors related to the nature of the radon source itself, environmental conditions, and the presence of mitigating factors, if any. In this study, crushed granite samples of different types, particle diameters, and moisture contents were compared in simplified test systems with regard to radon emanation from the samples. The effects of selected mitigating factors, namely, ventilation and different barriers to diffusion of emanated radon were determined.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 64,
place = {United States},
year = 1991,
month =
}

Conference:
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