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Title: Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems

Abstract

The objectives of Project 1.2 were to determine and evaluate the effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on the operational capabilities of shipboard sonar and other types of hydroacoustic systems. Project 1.3b included all measurements at ranges greater than 10 nautical miles and the results of these measurements constitute the subject of this report. This report concerns the effects of the underwater nuclear explosion, Sword Fish, on: (a) Long-range active detection systems at the first convergence zone (25 to 30 miles); (b) Passive shipboard or submarine sonars at a few hundred miles; and (c) Long-range passive detection and surveillance at Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and Missile Impact Locating System (MILS) stations at several hundred to several thousand miles. A submarine station at the first convergence zone and five shipboard stations at ranges from 200 miles to 5,000 miles recorded signals from hydrophones suspended at various depths to approximately 2,000 feet. Submarines on other assignments recorded signals on standard submarine sonar equipment on a not-to interfere basis. SOSUS and MILS stations operated normally during the period and also made special magnetic-tape and strip-chart recordings of signals from single hydrophones from before burst time to several hours after burst.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Navy Electronics Lab., San Diego, CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
7110375
Report Number(s):
AD-A-995394/4/XAB
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; DOMINIC PROJECT; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; UNDERWATER EXPLOSIONS; SONAR; PERFORMANCE; PACIFIC OCEAN; EXPLOSIONS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RANGE FINDERS; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS 450202* -- Explosions & Explosives-- Nuclear-- Weaponry-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

McMillan, T., La Houssaye, W.P., and Johnson, C.T. Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
McMillan, T., La Houssaye, W.P., & Johnson, C.T. Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems. United States.
McMillan, T., La Houssaye, W.P., and Johnson, C.T. 1985. "Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7110375,
title = {Operation Dominic, Shot Sword Fish. Project Officer's report - Project 1. 3b. Effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on hydroacoustic systems},
author = {McMillan, T. and La Houssaye, W.P. and Johnson, C.T.},
abstractNote = {The objectives of Project 1.2 were to determine and evaluate the effects of an underwater nuclear explosion on the operational capabilities of shipboard sonar and other types of hydroacoustic systems. Project 1.3b included all measurements at ranges greater than 10 nautical miles and the results of these measurements constitute the subject of this report. This report concerns the effects of the underwater nuclear explosion, Sword Fish, on: (a) Long-range active detection systems at the first convergence zone (25 to 30 miles); (b) Passive shipboard or submarine sonars at a few hundred miles; and (c) Long-range passive detection and surveillance at Sound Surveillance System (SOSUS) and Missile Impact Locating System (MILS) stations at several hundred to several thousand miles. A submarine station at the first convergence zone and five shipboard stations at ranges from 200 miles to 5,000 miles recorded signals from hydrophones suspended at various depths to approximately 2,000 feet. Submarines on other assignments recorded signals on standard submarine sonar equipment on a not-to interfere basis. SOSUS and MILS stations operated normally during the period and also made special magnetic-tape and strip-chart recordings of signals from single hydrophones from before burst time to several hours after burst.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1985,
month = 9
}

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  • Shot Sword Fish was an operational test of the ASROC antisubmarine weapon system. The general objectives of the project were (1) to record and measure the formation, growth, and dissipation of the visible surface phenomena, including slicks, spray domes, plumes, fallout, base surge, and foam patch resulting from the underwater detonation of an ASROC weapon; (2) to use the data obtained to estimate the actual depth of burst, position of burst, yield, and bubble period; (3) to determine the location of ships and platforms in the experimental array before, during, and after the test; (4) to provide surface-phenomena time-of-arrival datamore » at platforms and ships in the array for use by other projects; and 85) to make the results available for improving the surface-phenomena scaling and prediction techniques employed f,r establishing delivery and lethal ranges for fleet nuclear weapons. In general, there was good agreement between the observed dimensions of the Sword Fish phenomena and the predictions.« less
  • The aim of this project was to measure high-altitude wind velocities and diffusion coefficients in the altitude region between 60 and 150 km. The method involved the ejection of a sodium vapor trail from a Cajun rocket at dust or dawn twilight. The sodium was sunlit, and as a result of emission of resonance radiation, was visible against a darkened background for about 20 minutes. The trail was photographed simultaneously from four different sites, allowing for subsequent triangulation to determine the altitude of various parts of the cloud. A major application of these wind and diffusion data, taken at duskmore » and dawn following the high-altitude nuclear tests, was to aid in determining the disposition of the nuclear debris.« less
  • The first experimental objective in support of the Fish Bowl Series was to make accurate measurements of the physical properties of the normal atmosphere (1) to provide information required for an accurate analysis of blast and shock wave data, (2) to provide density data permitting a more precise determination of the Thor reentry trajectory and (3) to provide data required for accurate determination of the functional relationship between the ionization produced by the detonation and the radiation that produced it. The second objective was to make measurements shortly after each nuclear detonation to measure heating and changes in atmospheric densitymore » and pressure in the vicinity of the fireball.« less
  • The electromagnetic energy incident on ground-based antennas on Johnston Island as a result of the five high-altitude nuclear bursts of the Fish Bowl series was measured in the frequency regions around 925, 3000, and 24,500 Mc by the radiometric techniques described in this report. The data, recorded in terms of antenna temperatures, are directly interpretable as physical temperatures of the thermally radiating regions and allow the deduction of the attenuation encountered by radio-frequency signals passing through the burst regions. The time history of the temperatures of the burst region for the three microwave frequencies of the radiometric measurement presented considerablemore » insight into the physical processes occurring during the high-altitude events. Electron densities and recombination rates were deduced from the radiometric data.« less
  • For complete abstract see Vol. I (ADA-995 425).