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Title: Research effort aims at floating production technology

Abstract

This paper reports that a 3 year research and development program on floating production systems (FPS), instigated by the Royal Norwegian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (NTNF), has refined and qualified technologies for North Sea and arctic conditions. The FPS 2000 program, which cost 58 million kroner ($10 million), concentrated mainly on mooring systems and pipeline technology, along with new system concepts and cost reduction measures. More than 30 projects have been completed within the scheme. The anchoring and positioning project concentrates on developing methods for simulating behavior of mooring systems for large volume structures in deep water. It also seeks ways to determine efficiency of dynamic positioning thrusters under extreme conditions.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7103709
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7103709
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oil and Gas Journal; (United States); Journal Volume: 90:33
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 42 ENGINEERING; COST; MINIMIZATION; MOORINGS; DESIGN; NORWAY; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; PETROLEUM INDUSTRY; OFFSHORE OPERATIONS; PIPELINES; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; EUROPE; INDUSTRY; SCANDINAVIA 020700* -- Petroleum-- Economics, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 022000 -- Petroleum-- Transport, Handling, & Storage; 423000 -- Engineering-- Marine Engineering-- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Not Available. Research effort aims at floating production technology. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Not Available. Research effort aims at floating production technology. United States.
Not Available. Mon . "Research effort aims at floating production technology". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7103709,
title = {Research effort aims at floating production technology},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {This paper reports that a 3 year research and development program on floating production systems (FPS), instigated by the Royal Norwegian Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (NTNF), has refined and qualified technologies for North Sea and arctic conditions. The FPS 2000 program, which cost 58 million kroner ($10 million), concentrated mainly on mooring systems and pipeline technology, along with new system concepts and cost reduction measures. More than 30 projects have been completed within the scheme. The anchoring and positioning project concentrates on developing methods for simulating behavior of mooring systems for large volume structures in deep water. It also seeks ways to determine efficiency of dynamic positioning thrusters under extreme conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {Oil and Gas Journal; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 90:33,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 17 00:00:00 EDT 1992},
month = {Mon Aug 17 00:00:00 EDT 1992}
}
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