skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae

Abstract

Six strains of algae and one Euglena sp. were tested for their ability to bioaccumulate nickel. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni was used together with a microplate technique to determine the conditions for nickel removal by axenic cultures of cyanobacteria, green algae, and one euglenoid. The cyanobacteria tested were found to be more sensitive to nickel toxicity than the green algae or the Euglena sp. The concentration factor (CF) for nickel was determined under a variety of conditions and found to be in the range from 0 to 3.0 x 10/sup 3/. The effect of environmental variables on nickel uptake was examined, and a striking pH effect for biaccumulation was observed, with most of the algal strains accumulating nickel optimally at approximately pH 8.0. Competition experiments for binding sites between nickel and other cations as well as with other complexing anions, showed that /sup 63/Ni uptake was affected only by cobalt and by humic acids.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Minnesota, Navarre
OSTI Identifier:
7099363
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 18:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ALGAE; SENSITIVITY; NICKEL 63; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; REMOVAL; TOXICITY; PH VALUE; LABELLING; TRACER TECHNIQUES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; NICKEL ISOTOPES; NUCLEI; PLANTS; RADIOISOTOPES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Wang, H.K., and Wood, J.M. Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1021/es00120a011.
Wang, H.K., & Wood, J.M. Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae. United States. doi:10.1021/es00120a011.
Wang, H.K., and Wood, J.M. 1984. "Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae". United States. doi:10.1021/es00120a011.
@article{osti_7099363,
title = {Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae},
author = {Wang, H.K. and Wood, J.M.},
abstractNote = {Six strains of algae and one Euglena sp. were tested for their ability to bioaccumulate nickel. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni was used together with a microplate technique to determine the conditions for nickel removal by axenic cultures of cyanobacteria, green algae, and one euglenoid. The cyanobacteria tested were found to be more sensitive to nickel toxicity than the green algae or the Euglena sp. The concentration factor (CF) for nickel was determined under a variety of conditions and found to be in the range from 0 to 3.0 x 10/sup 3/. The effect of environmental variables on nickel uptake was examined, and a striking pH effect for biaccumulation was observed, with most of the algal strains accumulating nickel optimally at approximately pH 8.0. Competition experiments for binding sites between nickel and other cations as well as with other complexing anions, showed that /sup 63/Ni uptake was affected only by cobalt and by humic acids.},
doi = {10.1021/es00120a011},
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 18:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 2
}
  • Green algae, Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck var. vulgaris, isolated from an arsenic-polluted environment, was examined for the effects of arsenic levels, arsenic valence, temperature illumination intensity, phosphate levels, metabolism inhibitors, heat treatment on the growth, and arsenic bioaccumulation. The following conclusions were reached from the experimental results: (a) The growth of the cell increased with an increase of arsenic(V) levels of the medium up to 1000 ppm, and the cell survived even at 10,000 ppm; (b) The arsenic bioaccumulation increased with an increase of the arsenic level. The maximum accumulation of arsenic was about 50,000 ..mu..g As/g dry cell; (c) Themore » growth decreased with an increase of the arsenic(III) level and the cell was cytolyzed at levels higher than 40 ppm; (d) No arsenic(V) was bioaccumulated by a cell which had been pretreated with dinitrophenol (respiratory inhibitor) or with heat. Little effect of NaN/sub 3/ (photosynthesis inhibitor) on the bioaccumulation was observed. 8 references, 2 figures, 6 tables.« less
  • The objectives of this study were to test the hypothesis that bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) by phytoplankton is correlated to the compound's octanol/water partition coefficient (K[sub ow]) in a predictive relationship in laboratory experiments, and to confirm these findings with field observations. In laboratory experiments the authors measured the uptake of 40 representative polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners over time under conditions that inhibited and allowed phytoplankton growth. Results indicated that the bioaccumulation process is consistent with partitioning from water into cell lipids but is slower than previously thought. The uptake of PCBs was slow relative to growth ofmore » phytoplankton, preventing the chemical from reaching thermodynamic equilibrium in algal cells under conditions promoting growth (nonwinter). Thus under non-winter field conditions, many PCB congeners never reach equilibrium concentrations. Food-chain models that assume equilibrium between HOCs and the primary trophic level could be inaccurate and may need to use a kinetic framework.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • A Citrobacter sp. accumulates uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) as crystalline HUO{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (HUP), using enzymatically generated inorganic phosphate. Ni was not removed by this mechanism, but cells already loaded with HUP removed Ni{sup 2+} by intercalative ion-exchange, forming Ni(UO{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}{center_dot}7H{sub 2}O, as concluded by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analyses. The loaded biomass became saturated with Ni rapidly, with a molar ratio of Ni:U in the cellbound deposit of approx. 1:6; Ni penetration was probably surface-localized. Cochallenge of the cells with Ni{sup 2+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and glycerol 2-phosphate (phosphatemore » donor for phosphate release and metal bioprecipitation) gave sustained removal of both metals in a flow through bioreactor, with more extensively accumulated Ni. We propose `Microbially Enhanced Chemisorption of Heavy Metals` (MECHM) to describe this hybrid mechanism of metal bioaccumulation via intercalation into preformed, biogenic crystals, and note also that MECHM can promote the removal of the transuranic radionuclide neptunium, which is difficult to achieve by conventional methods. 42 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.« less
  • Studies were undertaken to determine the degree of bioconcentration, kinetics of accumulation, and tissue distribution of Ni in marine clams exposed to seawater enriched with subtoxic levels of Ni. Nickel concentrations in the gills of whole clams were three times greater than those of excised gills exposed to the same concentration for 48 hr. Results show that both uptake and elimination rates of Ni were biphasic, with an initial rapid phase (probably surface adsorption and desorption) and a second slower phase responsible for net accumulation. Whole clams accumulated substantial quantities of Ni. However, much of this was associated with themore » shell and bioconcentration of Ni from seawater occurred to a much lesser degree than Cd, Cu, or Hg under similar conditions. (JMT)« less