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Title: Choosing our energy future

Abstract

Dr. Starr notes that the world is in a period of transition from cheap to expensive energy and faces two options: it can plan an energy-limited society with lowered expectations, or it can exploit new energy sources. A successful energy-conservation effort can be based on abundant supplies at higher prices, relying on cost to lower demand. A plentiful mix of competitive energy sources is on hand if we perceive an expansionist future. Forecasts of a growing and better-educated workforce mean that annual US economic growth must exceed 2.5% for the present social level to continue, but electricity generation must be more than doubled by the year 2000 for this to happen. Oil substitutes are now technologically possible, but this will not assure adequate electric power. Nuclear power plants will have to provide added power in the next few decades. (DCK)

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7086178
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7086178
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
EPRI J.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5:7; Other Information: Adapted from presentation to second annual conference on international energy issues, Cambridge, England, June 1980
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ELECTRIC POWER; ENERGY SUPPLIES; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENERGY POLICY; FORECASTING; POWER DEMAND; SOCIAL IMPACT; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; POWER 296000* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Electric Power

Citation Formats

Starr, C. Choosing our energy future. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
Starr, C. Choosing our energy future. United States.
Starr, C. Mon . "Choosing our energy future". United States.
@article{osti_7086178,
title = {Choosing our energy future},
author = {Starr, C.},
abstractNote = {Dr. Starr notes that the world is in a period of transition from cheap to expensive energy and faces two options: it can plan an energy-limited society with lowered expectations, or it can exploit new energy sources. A successful energy-conservation effort can be based on abundant supplies at higher prices, relying on cost to lower demand. A plentiful mix of competitive energy sources is on hand if we perceive an expansionist future. Forecasts of a growing and better-educated workforce mean that annual US economic growth must exceed 2.5% for the present social level to continue, but electricity generation must be more than doubled by the year 2000 for this to happen. Oil substitutes are now technologically possible, but this will not assure adequate electric power. Nuclear power plants will have to provide added power in the next few decades. (DCK)},
doi = {},
journal = {EPRI J.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 5:7,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {9}
}