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Title: Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer

Abstract

For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7065665
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 7065665
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sea Technology; (United States); Journal Volume: 35:8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; GAMMA SPECTROMETERS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; MARINE SURVEYS; GAMMA SPECTROSCOPY; SEA BED; EXPLORATION; MAPPING; MINERAL RESOURCES; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; RESOURCES; SPECTROMETERS; SPECTROSCOPY; SURVEYS 440700* -- Geophysical & Meteorological Instrumentation-- (1990-); 540310 -- Environment, Aquatic-- Basic Studies-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Jones, D.G. Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Jones, D.G. Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer. United States.
Jones, D.G. Mon . "Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7065665,
title = {Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer},
author = {Jones, D.G.},
abstractNote = {For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.},
doi = {},
journal = {Sea Technology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 35:8,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}
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